Ford Inside News Community - Reply to Topic
Thread: UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Inside News Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-06-2010 06:44 PM
Tahoe
Re: UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low

Only UAW to blame for its predicament.
04-05-2010 07:13 PM
mchicha
Re: UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low

Quote:
Originally Posted by ausrutherford View Post
Everyone is to blame for this from the government (regulations), companies (poor management) and the union for their years of defending harmful workers.
Only UAW is to blame for its own woes.
They forced companies to choose between products and them... in the end they almost lost it all.
04-04-2010 12:37 AM
ausrutherford
Re: UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low

Everyone is to blame for this from the government (regulations), companies (poor management) and the union for their years of defending harmful workers.



04-03-2010 02:39 PM
ndwariga
UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low

<!--Saxotech Paragraph Count: 2
-->
UAW ranks fell 18% in 2009 to post-WWII low

WASHINGTON Ė The ranks of UAW members fell to a new post-World War II low in 2009 as the bankruptcies of General Motors and Chrysler led to thousands of manufacturing job losses.

According to its annual report filed with federal overseers today, the UAW had 355,191 members at the end of 2009, a loss of 75,846 members, or 18%, from the 431,037 it reported at the end of 2008. The unionís net assets shrank by $69 million to $1.12 billion.

UAW President Ron Gettelfinger was paid $173,065 in salary and other compensation, a slight decrease from the $174,098 he earned in 2008. The unionís overhead costs fell slightly, as did its political lobbying, to $9.7 million from $10.6 million in 2008.

Gettelfinger and the UAW were key players in the GM and Chrysler bankruptcies, convincing the Obama administration to grant the health care trust fund for UAW retirees stakes in GM and Chrysler instead of wiping them out. The UAW also successfully reversed two decisions to close UAW-represented plants.

But both companies shed thousands of workers throughout their plants, and the UAW also lost the only Toyota plant it represented in the United States when the Japanese automaker decided to close its Fremont, Calif., factory. Outside of factories where it was invited in by Detroit automakers under joint ventures, the UAW has only successfully organized one foreign-owned auto plant ó the Volkswagen factory in Pennsylvania that closed in 1988.

In recent years it has focused on winning new elections in non-traditional industries, such as casino workers.

The UAW's membership peaked around 1.5 million workers in the 1970s.
http://www.freep.com/article/2010032...053/1014/rss13

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome