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2011 FORD MUSTANG GT LEADS CLASS WITH 26 MPG HIGHWAY, 412 HORSEPOWER
•New 2011 Mustang GT vaults to the top of its class with final fuel economy certified by the EPA this week at 26 mpg highway and 17 mpg city​

•The Mustang GT – carrying a 412-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8 engine and six-speed manual transmission – delivers incredible acceleration in addition to fuel economy, thanks in part to the flexibility of the six-speed manual transmission
•The entire Mustang lineup now achieves segment-leading fuel economy with the Mustang V-6 being the first car ever to deliver 305 hp and 31 mpg and the Mustang GT achieving best-in-class fuel economy of 26 mpg​

DEARBORN, Mich., March 16, 2010 – The 2011 Ford Mustang GT, powered by a new 412-hp 5.0-liter V-8 engine, adds yet another notch to its belt: an EPA rating of 26 mpg highway when equipped with the six-speed manual transmission, giving it the best fuel economy in its class.​

“The 2011 Mustang continues to exceed expectations in every category, and these fuel economy numbers are another chapter in an incredible story,” said Derrick Kuzak, Ford’s group vice president, Global Product Development. “To offer this kind of horsepower and class-leading fuel economy in a comfortable, beautiful, tech-savvy and affordable package – it’s really unprecedented.”​

With the six-speed manual transmission, Mustang GT coupe is rated at 17 mpg city and
26 highway, while models with the available six-speed automatic achieve 18 mpg city and
25 highway.​

The GT’s best in class fuel numbers come on the heels of the Mustang V-6, which just last week cracked the record books as not only the most fuel-efficient Mustang ever, but also the first production car in history to produce 305 horsepower and 31 mpg highway.​

Mustang GT is powered by an all-new 5.0-liter double-overhead-camshaft (DOHC) V-8 with a host of advanced features to deliver the combination of power and class-leading fuel economy.​

Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing (Ti-VCT) adjusts the valvetrain in microseconds depending on driver inputs. A carefully tuned intake and exhaust system ensures free breathing at all engine speeds. And all-aluminum construction results in a lightweight yet durable powerplant.​

A pair of new transmissions, both with six forward ratios, also play a large part in making the 2011 Mustang a breakthrough car. Regardless of whether drivers want to shift for themselves or let the car shift for them, they’re treated to carefully chosen gear ratios to maximize fuel economy while still delivering high-horsepower performance​

“Mustang powertrain development has reached a point where customers don’t have to choose between fuel efficiency and performance,” says Barb Samardzich, Ford vice president of Global Powertrain Engineering. “Thanks to technologies like Ti-VCT and our six-speed gearboxes, a Mustang driver has the best of both worlds.”​

Fuel economy improvements on all Mustang models
Mustang GT shares fuel economy accolades with the new 3.7-liter Mustang V-6 – the first production car ever to offer both 300-plus horsepower and 31 mpg on the highway. Official 2011 EPA fuel economy ratings for the Mustang product line are:​

Mustang V-6
•19 mpg city and 31 highway (automatic coupe)
•19 mpg city and 29 highway (manual coupe)​

Mustang GT
•18 mpg city and 25 highway (automatic coupe)
•17 mpg city and 26 highway (manual coupe)​

In addition to powertrain improvements, upgrades to Mustang’s body and chassis design contribute to its 2011 performance. Examples include:​

•New EPAS eliminates the drag of an engine-operated hydraulic power steering pump
•Combined with the new six-speed transmissions, standard 3.31 (manual) and 3.15 (automatic) rear axle ratios provide an ideal blend of relaxed cruising rpm and all-out acceleration
•Aerodynamic improvements include a new front fascia on the Mustang GT, tire spats on the rear wheels, modified underbody shields, a taller air dam and an added rear decklid seal
The 2011 Mustang is built at the AutoAlliance International Plant in Flat Rock, Mich., and goes on sale this spring.​

# # #​

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 198,000 employees and about 90 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury and Volvo. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford’s products, please visit www.ford.com or click the Ford logo on the top right hand side of fomoconews.com



 

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I noticed how this article failed to mention that the whole top fuel economy thing is a little shady. Hope people realize that this new OHC engine runs off premium gas, so you're not really gaining anything as far saving money. What you make up for in mileage, you lose back paying the extra 20 cents or so per gallon. Either way doesn't matter, until a OHV goes back into the Mustang, we performance guys are not going to buy it anyway.
 

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I noticed how this article failed to mention that the whole top fuel economy thing is a little shady. Hope people realize that this new OHC engine runs off premium gas, so you're not really gaining anything as far saving money. What you make up for in mileage, you lose back paying the extra 20 cents or so per gallon. Either way doesn't matter, until a OHV goes back into the Mustang, we performance guys are not going to buy it anyway.
The technology and patents in OHV designs have advanced so much with GM that if Ford went back to OHV they would just be enriching GM’s coffers through patent licensing.
OHV, with VVT, intake, out, direct injection, dry sump, etc, etc,

I am impressed with Ford’s new found effort on efficiency and performance. They certainly are ahead of everyone using DOHC designs for economy, except GM which somehow seems to have the same Engineering prowess as Ford.

Funny how the horsepower war and economy war is now a two horse race. Even Honda, the perennial winner of economy is no longer playing. Ford and GM seem to have overtaken Japan with economy and power.

Camaro needs to step up and shove the corvette 436 HP mill in there, which gets 28 mpg in the corvette, which will mean for 2013 Ford will up the ante, taking this horpower game north of 500 HP... No no one can play in that arena as efficiently and cost effectively as Detroit.

If GM is extracting 505 HP from the Z06 now, imagine where the next generation mill will be, 600 HP? That will force AWD and 700 HP for the ZR-1.

I have no doubt Ford can easily keep up.
 

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The technology and patents in OHV designs have advanced so much with GM that if Ford went back to OHV they would just be enriching GM’s coffers through patent licensing.
OHV, with VVT, intake, out, direct injection, dry sump, etc, etc,

I am impressed with Ford’s new found effort on efficiency and performance. They certainly are ahead of everyone using DOHC designs for economy, except GM which somehow seems to have the same Engineering prowess as Ford.

Funny how the horsepower war and economy war is now a two horse race. Even Honda, the perennial winner of economy is no longer playing. Ford and GM seem to have overtaken Japan with economy and power.

Camaro needs to step up and shove the corvette 436 HP mill in there, which gets 28 mpg in the corvette, which will mean for 2013 Ford will up the ante, taking this horpower game north of 500 HP... No no one can play in that arena as efficiently and cost effectively as Detroit.

If GM is extracting 505 HP from the Z06 now, imagine where the next generation mill will be, 600 HP? That will force AWD and 700 HP for the ZR-1.

I have no doubt Ford can easily keep up.
I have no doubt that Ford will keep up with GM. If anything GM is going to be the one playing catch up here shortly. My concern with OHC engines is the expense and sheer size of them. I mean the old 4.6 Modular motor was larger than a Boss 429! The reason the Mustang grew so much in 2005 was so Ford could have some extra room under the hood for more performance pieces like headers.

My biggest concern over the OHC V8's is there expense as far as performance goes. If you want to do 3 angle valve jobs to heads, that's automatically double labor over an OHV V8. Also, you have four timing chains! As mechanic I don't think people realize how difficult that is to put back into proper timing after disassembling it. Plus if you want to change the lift on the valves, you have to buy 4 cams instead of 1! That's quadruple the expense right there in parts, let alone the labor if someone does it for you. Another issue I have as well is the fact that the front timing cover requires complete disassembly of the entire front of the engine. Where as on the OHV V8, it is much smaller and easier to access on most motors.

What I'm trying to say is that OHC V8's don't really have the advantages people say, and GM has proved it. Their OHV engines make great power and get respectable gas mileage for the displacement. Plus the fact that they are so much cheaper to work one, which is good for the customer.
 
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