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I can't speak for anybody else, but I'm not forgetting anything. Compared to normally aspirated 6-cylinders, 4-cylinder turbos make comparable power and better torque. It's not a question of how much power they make, but how they make their power. In the last four years I've had four German 2.0T's in my garage. They're punchy and can be somewhat fun-to-drive, but they're also buzzy and unrefined. The vast majority of turbo fours sound flatulent, and custom exhausts can make them sound even worse.

I've said it before, and I'll reiterate ... the 2.3T is a fine base engine. Probably an ideal base engine for the Ranger. But why does it have to be the only engine?
I agree.......I haven't driven the 2.3 but we have a 2.0 in an Escape and it's pretty buzzy and doesn't feel very powerful. I was hoping for a bonafied option to replace my F-150 in a few years and this isn't it........but they will have to be replacing this "old" Ranger before to long......so I'll keep hoping.
 

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Ranger Raptor Spied

Motor Trend

SPIED! FORD RANGER RAPTOR CAUGHT ON U.S. SOIL
Alex Nishimoto Words
January 24, 2018

Off-road truck shows its Raptor grille for the first time

The 2019 Ford Ranger just debuted in U.S.-spec trim at the Detroit auto show, and though Ford wouldn’t admit an off-road-focused Raptor variant was in the works for North America, it’s clearly testing one in the U.S. right now.

These spy shots were taken by readers Mike Leonard and Amanda Boyd, who saw the truck on a flatbed heading west on I-44 between Tulsa and Oklahoma City. The camouflage made the pickup stand out, but the flared fenders and all-terrain tires made the sighting even more unusual. What gives this away as a Raptor variant, though, is the unique grille featuring the “Ford” logo in big block letters—just like the grille on the F-150 Raptor. We can see there was camo covering the grille originally, but luckily for us the wind blew it off.

There’s a chance this could be the Australia-bound Ranger Raptor that’s debuting in Thailand on February 7. The wheels appear to match the ones we’ve seen in videos, as do the beefier fenders. But why is Ford testing it in the U.S.? We hope it’s because the Blue Oval is readying a Ranger Raptor for the North American market as well. We’ve heard the Australian market will get the Ranger Raptor with a tuned 3.2-liter turbodiesel I-5, but a high-output version of the twin-turbo 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6 sounds like a nice fit for a U.S.-market model. The Aussie Ranger Raptor should also get a 10-speed automatic transmission, low-range transfer case, unique off-road-tuned suspension, and 17-inch wheels wrapped in BFGoodrich A/T tires.

We’ll have to wait and see what Ford has in store for the Ranger Raptor in the U.S., but these spy shots are a very promising sign to us. Check out the exclusive shots in the gallery below.



 

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Re: Ranger Raptor Spied

Motor Trend

SPIED! FORD RANGER RAPTOR CAUGHT ON U.S. SOIL
Alex Nishimoto Words
January 24, 2018

Off-road truck shows its Raptor grille for the first time

The 2019 Ford Ranger just debuted in U.S.-spec trim at the Detroit auto show, and though Ford wouldn’t admit an off-road-focused Raptor variant was in the works for North America, it’s clearly testing one in the U.S. right now.

These spy shots were taken by readers Mike Leonard and Amanda Boyd, who saw the truck on a flatbed heading west on I-44 between Tulsa and Oklahoma City. The camouflage made the pickup stand out, but the flared fenders and all-terrain tires made the sighting even more unusual. What gives this away as a Raptor variant, though, is the unique grille featuring the “Ford” logo in big block letters—just like the grille on the F-150 Raptor. We can see there was camo covering the grille originally, but luckily for us the wind blew it off.

There’s a chance this could be the Australia-bound Ranger Raptor that’s debuting in Thailand on February 7. The wheels appear to match the ones we’ve seen in videos, as do the beefier fenders. But why is Ford testing it in the U.S.? We hope it’s because the Blue Oval is readying a Ranger Raptor for the North American market as well. We’ve heard the Australian market will get the Ranger Raptor with a tuned 3.2-liter turbodiesel I-5, but a high-output version of the twin-turbo 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6 sounds like a nice fit for a U.S.-market model. The Aussie Ranger Raptor should also get a 10-speed automatic transmission, low-range transfer case, unique off-road-tuned suspension, and 17-inch wheels wrapped in BFGoodrich A/T tires.

We’ll have to wait and see what Ford has in store for the Ranger Raptor in the U.S., but these spy shots are a very promising sign to us. Check out the exclusive shots in the gallery below.




Based on the taillights, tailgate without the spoiler-like protrusion, lack of the built-in skirt-like extensions at the rear bottom after the rear wheels, and third brake light which isn't flush, the Ranger Raptor prototype seems to be based on the RoTW model.
RoTW 2016 Ranger

US-market 2019 Ranger

Non-flush roof-mounted third brake light of the RoTW Ranger (below), this is flush on the US version.


Motor Trend, not everything LHD is US market. The RoTW Ranger is manufactured in RHD and LHD.
 

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It might be an early test mule before it was fitted with the new parts. I know the front-end is different but did the ROTW Ranger get the new fender/tailgate that comes with the updated model? I can also see that the new Ranger has a revised taillight shape, probably to accommodate the parking sensors in the lower 1/3.
 

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It might be an early test mule before it was fitted with the new parts. I know the front-end is different but did the ROTW Ranger get the new fender/tailgate that comes with the updated model?
The US market Ranger has a different rear pickup bed (it has skirt like extensions at the rear), its taillights have a different shape (not interchangeable with RoTW taillights) and it has a reshaped aluminum tailgate with a semi-spoiler-like extension.


I can also see that the new Ranger has a revised taillight shape, probably to accommodate the parking sensors in the lower 1/3.
Rear parking sensors on both the US-market Ranger and RoTW Ranger are on the bumper.


Spy photos of the 2018/19 RoTW Ranger shows that it retains the old rear end, old hood and old fenders. But shares its new grille with the US market Ranger Lariat.
Refreshed (2018/19) RoTW Ranger

 

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I can't speak for anybody else, but I'm not forgetting anything. Compared to normally aspirated 6-cylinders, 4-cylinder turbos make comparable power and better torque. It's not a question of how much power they make, but how they make their power. In the last four years I've had four German 2.0T's in my garage. They're punchy and can be somewhat fun-to-drive, but they're also buzzy and unrefined. The vast majority of turbo fours sound flatulent, and custom exhausts can make them sound even worse.

I've said it before, and I'll reiterate ... the 2.3T is a fine base engine. Probably an ideal base engine for the Ranger. But why does it have to be the only engine?

I would like to see the 2.7L turbo as an option, but if done properly and if it has to be the only engine available, then I'm fine with the 2.3 Turbo in place of a n/a V6. I recently let go of a 2013 MKZ turbo and, in every way, that engine was as pleasant as a naturally aspirated V6 was likely to be IMO, and as you suggest low end torque felt notably better. The exhaust note was actually fine as well, it didn't sound buzzy or thrashy and actually had a bit of a very muted, deep rumble to it even from the outside. (I initially thought it might be artificial noise piped through the stereo) I should also mention that this is in stark contrast to the last Impala sedan I had as a rental which was so thrashy and rough I thought it was the turbo four, and poppoed the hood to find a six under there. Still, I agree with you in that I wouldn't consider a turbo four as a good candidate for a an aftermarket exhaust, because that only ends one way for a four cylinder.
 

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Looks like the Ranger and Everest have been transformed into Military vehicles by the French.




I wonder what they might do when they see the upcoming Bronco.
 
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