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Fuel economy for the 2020 Ford Escape hybrid has been revealed, and it's impressive. The most frugal variant is the front-drive model, which delivers a whopping 44 mpg in the city, 37 on the highway and 41 in combined driving. The all-wheel-drive version's city fuel economy dips to 43, highway economy stays the same, and combined is 40.

These numbers put the Escape hybrid right inline with current and upcoming non-plug-in hybrid competition. The Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, which is only available with all-wheel drive, ties the all-wheel-drive Escape's 40 mpg combined rating. Highway economy is slightly worse at 41 mpg, and city fuel economy is slightly better at 38 mpg. The upcoming Honda CR-V Hybrid doesn't have official numbers yet, but estimates put it at potentially 42 mpg combined on the highway with all-wheel drive and 40 combined with front-wheel drive. The Kia Niro is the king of the segment for fuel economy, with its least-efficient Touring model getting 43 mpg combined, and its most efficient FE getting 50. However, it doesn't offer all-wheel drive at all, and it's a bit smaller than the other competitors listed here. The Nissan Rogue hybrid was discontinued for the 2020 model year, but 2019 models are likely still lurking, and they sit well behind the Ford, Toyota and Honda with a combined fuel economy of 34 mpg with front-wheel drive, and 33 with all-wheel drive.

When it comes to pricing, the Toyota has a lower base price at $29,220, which includes all-wheel drive. The Ford Escape starts at $29,450 for the front-wheel-drive version, and the all-wheel-drive model starts at $30,950
 

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DEARBORN – Your drive over the river and through the woods to grandma’s house this holiday season might cost you less if you’re behind the wheel of the all-new 2020 Ford Escape Hybrid.

With a best-in-class combined EPA-estimated fuel economy rating of 41 mpg, the redesigned front-wheel drive small SUV also tops its class while driving around town, with an EPA-estimated 44 mpg city. The 2020 Escape Hybrid Titanium with front-wheel drive has an EPA-estimated rating of 37 mpg on the highway.

With the average American driving 29 miles a day, making that trip in the all-new Escape Hybrid Titanium means barely using a gallon of fuel per trip – and fewer gas station stops along the journey. This makes the all-new Ford Escape Hybrid both easier on the wallet while helping to conserve fuel.

“This all-new Escape Hybrid is our best one yet, as it answers the call from our customers who loved the original Escape Hybrid but want better fuel efficiency without compromising interior space,” said Hau Thai-Tang, Ford chief product development and purchasing officer. “Plus, with driving range like no Escape before, we’re giving our customers a vehicle truly capable of letting them focus on living their lives while worrying less about stopping for gas.”

Each model in the all-new Escape lineup, whether hybrid-powered or equipped with EcoBoost® technology, has an EPA-estimated range of at least 400 miles per tank. Front-wheel-drive Escape Hybrid’s outstanding fuel efficiency is bolstered by an EPA-estimated 582-mile driving range per tank – more than enough for a one-way trip from Sacramento to San Diego.

Outfitted with available all-wheel drive, Escape Hybrid has an EPA-estimated 43 mpg city and 40 mpg combined with an EPA-estimated 568 miles of range. Like the front-wheel-drive Escape, the all-wheel-drive model has an EPA-estimated 37 mpg on the highway.

2020 Ford Escape Hybrid customers can see their potential fuel savings come to life with a new EV coach feature included in the 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster, which is standard on SE Sport and Titanium trim levels. EV coach lets drivers know when they’re using electric or hybrid power – allowing them to adjust their driving style to meet their power needs. In addition, eco mode, one of five standard selectable drive modes, helps conserve fuel when driving range is your priority.

There’s also plenty of room of passengers and cargo. The all-new Escape Hybrid packages its liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery smartly below the second-row seats rather than occupying a significant portion of the cargo area. The briefcase-shaped battery in the standard hybrid measures approximately one-third the size of the battery in the first Escape Hybrid, which was the world’s first-ever hybrid SUV when it debuted in 2004.
 

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40mpg average in an AWD SUV is not too shabby. You are lucking to average 20 mpg in most conventional SUV's
So if the ones that are rated at 30 get 20 (1/3 less); do the ones that are rated at 40 get 1/3 less too?

:angel
 

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So if the ones that are rated at 30 get 20 (1/3 less); do the ones that are rated at 40 get 1/3 less too?

:angel
I have had two MKZ Hybrids (a 2013 and now have a 2019, with a 2016 MKC non-hybrid in-between) and I find that, with my current (2019) MKZ hybrid and its EPA rating of 41 mpg, I get 35 mpg most of the time. Sometimes 36.something and sometimes 34.something (and occasionally 37.something) mpg. I don’t try to be a “hyper-miler” but I do try to be sensible when driving. I am VERY HAPPY with my MKZ in pretty much all respects.
 

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Very impressive numbers. I’m actually shocked given how far behind Toyota Ford had fallen in efficiency. They made it up in one big jump.
 
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