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I used to obsess over car cleanliness. Waxing, detailing the interior….I even had special tools for each job. Now I barely wash my car more than few times a year. The time I spent grieving or worrying about every little chip, scratch or finger print on my display, is long gone. Life is so much better, lol. And yeah, when I sell or return a lease, I just consider it wear and tear. Good riddens. On to the next.
 

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I used to obsess over car cleanliness. Waxing, detailing the interior….I even had special tools for each job. Now I barely wash my car more than few times a year. The time I spent grieving or worrying about every little chip, scratch or finger print on my display, is long gone. Life is so much better, lol. And yeah, when I sell or return a lease, I just consider it wear and tear. Good riddens. On to the next.
Thats how I was with my S60, very meticulous in my cleaning. Was spending about 3-4hrs every week cleaning that car, then I bough my Focus. Ive have it 6 years and washed it less than 20 times lol.
 

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The Aviator will sell because of image, not utility. In fact, some SUVs sell because of image but most sell because of ease of entry and the "command" view from the drivers' seat. I hated SUVs when they became common because they blocked the view of the cars in front of them, decreasing my traffic awareness. Now that there is a critical mass of them, many drivers say, "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em" and buy SUVs just to be able to see while in traffic. I've adapted by exploiting lane width as I'm not about to go over to the dark side (abandon my sedans).

Interestingly enough, the Aviator poses a marketing quandary for Ford. If the Aviator sells for image rather than utility, then the Explorer may be better marketed for its utility than its image. Aviator then may become a better play for lower-stance, sporty varieties than Explorer, an idea which goes against the grain at Ford.

I, for one, would love to see more emphasis on aftermarket performance modifier support from Lincoln for Aviator as an image play. BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Porsche all support aftermarket modifiers who breathe on their already hyper-sporty sub-brands. A Saleen Aviator? Whoooeeee!!

Just my opinion.
 

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The Aviator will sell because of image, not utility. In fact, some SUVs sell because of image but most sell because of ease of entry and the "command" view from the drivers' seat. I hated SUVs when they became common because they blocked the view of the cars in front of them, decreasing my traffic awareness. Now that there is a critical mass of them, many drivers say, "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em" and buy SUVs just to be able to see while in traffic. I've adapted by exploiting lane width as I'm not about to go over to the dark side (abandon my sedans).

Interestingly enough, the Aviator poses a marketing quandary for Ford. If the Aviator sells for image rather than utility, then the Explorer may be better marketed for its utility than its image. Aviator then may become a better play for lower-stance, sporty varieties than Explorer, an idea which goes against the grain at Ford.

I, for one, would love to see more emphasis on aftermarket performance modifier support from Lincoln for Aviator as an image play. BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Porsche all support aftermarket modifiers who breathe on their already hyper-sporty sub-brands. A Saleen Aviator? Whoooeeee!!

Just my opinion.
Lincoln is quiet luxury. Not Saleen. Not Nurburgring. Let the sport market to the Germans. Cadillac try to bet the europeans luxury brands and failed miserably.
 

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Lincoln is quiet luxury. Not Saleen. Not Nurburgring. Let the sport market to the Germans. Cadillac try to bet the europeans luxury brands and failed miserably.
Part of that is Cadillac's design. Recently looked at an ATS with the 2.0 and 6-Speed manual. Outside the car looks nice, albeit a bit dated (tired of their design language). The biggest issue was inside. The materials and design just didnt seem premium and the CUE system is on par or maybe even worse than the early MFT systems. The car drives great, feels better than the current 3 series, but the interior is so subpar compared to zee Germans. Not saying I want Lincoln to go sporty, but just fun when you want it to be.
 

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Lincoln is quiet luxury. Not Saleen. Not Nurburgring. Let the sport market to the Germans. Cadillac try to bet the europeans luxury brands and failed miserably.
Please, don't miss my point. It's about image. Lincoln will always market quiet luxury and that is as it should be. Nowhere did I suggest that Lincoln market their vehicles any differently than they currently do.

There is always a subset of buyers who want something more and will look to the aftermarket for it. ROI has to be considered, of course, but why not encourage and support outside vendors to have a shot at aftermarket mods? Ford knows how to do that and Ford owns Lincoln. Someone may want bigger wheels, more horsepower, a lower ride height, etc.. Lincoln doesn't have to market those mods; aftermarket vendors do that.

Americans are individualistic, they like to express themselves with something unique and they will pay to get what they want. Some are enthusiasts. Some are on this site. Straight-jackets are one-size-fits-all. For many Americans, cars are an extension of the self so why place artificial limits on customers?

Back in the day, there really were hot-rod Lincolns.
 

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The last successful sport Lincoln was the Mark VII LSC. Every body love it, even the auto journalism. Great car. But Lincoln today is another thing... and that is a good thing.



 

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The last successful sport Lincoln was the Mark VII LSC. Every body love it, even the auto journalism. Great car. But Lincoln today is another thing... and that is a good thing.



I remember the Mark vividly, as one of the 1st Lincolns I spend a lot of time with. But it had almost zero 'sport' compared to today's MKZ and Conti.
 

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I remember the Mark vividly, as one of the 1st Lincolns I spend a lot of time with. But it had almost zero 'sport' compared to today's MKZ and Conti.
The MKZ and Continental are obviously better in almost every way than the Mark VII, but neither have it's presence. The MKZ and Continental are both pretty generic in appearance, neither will ever be the classic that is the Mark VII!
 

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The MKZ and Continental are obviously better in almost every way than the Mark VII, but neither have it's presence. The MKZ and Continental are both pretty generic in appearance, neither will ever be the classic that is the Mark VII!
I can't think of a single thing that Conti does not do better than the Mark VII, and I bet you can't either.

As far as presence......opinions opinions opinions.

Here is another one, Conti has better presence and style.


 

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The Mark VII was a great car because it’s presence and futuristic style (by the time it debuted) . Was the first car with flush headlamps in USA. The current Continental doesn’t have the same impressive presence, IMO. Is a classic.
 

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The Mark VII was a great car because it’s presence and futuristic style (by the time it debuted) . Was the first car with flush headlamps in USA. The current Continental doesn’t have the same impressive presence, IMO. Is a classic.
Opinions vary.....like your previous remark that the Mark VII LSC was the last sport Lincoln.
Hardly true.
 

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The Mark VII LSC was about as good of a parts-bin special as it could have been, but it was a Fairmont with leather and stuffed with a Mustang V8.

I thought they were pretty cool...as a teenager...in the late 80's. Even then, I mostly liked them for the number of Mustang performance parts that were compatible.

The Mark VIII could outrun, outhandle, and generally embarrass the Mark VII, and wasn't limited by a log rear axle.

Honestly, it makes more sense to buy one of the previous-generation Continentals (already with the DOHC V8), and either replace or find one with the air suspension already replaced with conventional stuff. I sold a ton of the Monroe kits over the years, and the resulting ride/handling is very good...

...and it'd stomp a Mark VII.
 

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The Mark VII LSC was about as good of a parts-bin special as it could have been, but it was a Fairmont with leather and stuffed with a Mustang V8.

I thought they were pretty cool...as a teenager...in the late 80's. Even then, I mostly liked them for the number of Mustang performance parts that were compatible.

The Mark VIII could outrun, outhandle, and generally embarrass the Mark VII, and wasn't limited by a log rear axle.

Honestly, it makes more sense to buy one of the previous-generation Continentals (already with the DOHC V8), and either replace or find one with the air suspension already replaced with conventional stuff. I sold a ton of the Monroe kits over the years, and the resulting ride/handling is very good...

...and it'd stomp a Mark VII.

FWD V8??


No Thanks I would rather have the Mark VIII or LS V8 over last gen Contis with the V8. Those were more of cruisers than anything else.
 

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I was quite adoring of the VIII, especially that dramatic dash board and interior. It competed and won over Cadillac coupes. In LSC trim shown below, I almost purchased one, but I had 2 babies at the time, and 2 doors made little sense. I was in family mode. But as far as power goes, the 4.6L was admirable, and because it shared Mustang performance parts, it was an easy upgrade. But in stock trim, more than enough for most at 280/285 hp and Tq. And as I think about restoring a Lincoln classic one day, this now almost qualifies.



 
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