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My 2009 F150 has a 36 Gallon Tank and I love the range, I was literally on my way down to buy a 2011 Platinum 4x4 Ecoboost when I found out it had a 26 gallon tank, this is a deal breaker. I appreciate the Ecoboost has better mpg, but I want more range as well. Even with the improved fuel economy the Ecoboost with the 26 gallon will struggle to match the range of my 5.4 with 36 gallon.

10 extra gallons of gasoline weights about 65lbs, so what is the reason for this glaring omission of something that is optional on all of the other engines!
 

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I recall my 2007 FX4 4X4 with the 5.4L and large 36 gallon tank could achieve over 600 miles on a tank, traveling all highway.
The new turbo option with 4x4 and 26 gal tank should achieve about 550 miles per tank all highway, but probably match or best the 5.4L distance when driving mostly city. Overall, It would be kind of nice to know you are driving roughly the same distance, and pumping 10 gallons less per tank, while also getting far more performance and fewer emissions.

Not sure why the smaller tank tho.
 

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You also have to leave some fuel in reserve. It is not good for the truck to run it bone dry and even Ford says so in the manual.

If you average around 20 mpg for EB in the smaller 26 gallon tank, leaving about 5 gallons in reserve, that is 20 mpg x 21 g = only 420 miles.

If you're towing and get only 12 mpg, 12 x 21 is is about 250 miles before you have to fill up again.

In the first example the extra 10 gallons will bring you back up to 620 miles with room to spare. In the towing example it will be near 400 miles.

We want and need the 36 gallon tank for EcoBoost specially since EB is the Max Tow truck.
 

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I can think of no logical reason Ford doesnt offer the big tank with the EB engine. Its makes zero sense and has been beaten to death on the F series forums. I cant figure out why they did this. Where it makes a major difference is towing 10K where you get 10 mpg if your lucky. You dont have to pull over and stop every 200 miles.
 

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The 5.0L does not come with the Max Tow Package, has 400-600 lbs less payload, and gets worse fuel economy. We are not interested in a 5.0 or any other engine but EcoBoost.
 

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I can think of no logical reason Ford doesnt offer the big tank with the EB engine. Its makes zero sense and has been beaten to death on the F series forums. I cant figure out why they did this. Where it makes a major difference is towing 10K where you get 10 mpg if your lucky. You dont have to pull over and stop every 200 miles.
Exactly......
 

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Just a theory, but the EPA fuel economy drive cycles are run with a full tank. It's possible that the extra 65 lbs in gasoline would have dropped either the city or highway (or both) cycles by 1 mpg on the sticker, which is extremely valuable from a marketing position.

Similarly, I know that the orginal Ford Escape Hybrid had a "rated capacity" on the fuel tank (and stop trigger for the gas pump) that was below the max orignal capacity, because if it were full, it would push it into the next EPA vehicle class per its weight. Heard this directly from a Ford engineer during a lecture at a univerisity some 5 years ago.
 

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I can think of no logical reason Ford doesnt offer the big tank with the EB engine. Its makes zero sense and has been beaten to death on the F series forums. I cant figure out why they did this. Where it makes a major difference is towing 10K where you get 10 mpg if your lucky. You dont have to pull over and stop every 200 miles.
I can't imagine getting only 200 miles on a tank using the EcoBoost motor, because I can't imagine getting only 10mpg towing, unless you are driving real hard and past the tow/haul limits. I have towed many things, although nothing past 10K, but I do know that plenty of torque is your friend, even for fuel economy. And if you do this frequently, I am not so sure the V6 is for you, nor is the F-150. Perhaps you need a SD Diesel, that will save you money and will tow much easier. Ford must have had a reason for the lack of a larger tank. Shame however for some.



So either
 

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I can't imagine getting only 200 miles on a tank using the EcoBoost motor, because I can't imagine getting only 10mpg towing, unless you are driving real hard and past the tow/haul limits. I have towed many things, although nothing past 10K, but I do know that plenty of torque is your friend, even for fuel economy. And if you do this frequently, I am not so sure the V6 is for you, nor is the F-150. Perhaps you need a SD Diesel, that will save you money and will tow much easier. Ford must have had a reason for the lack of a larger tank. Shame however for some.



So either
Well, the max tow is rated at 11,300 lbs I believe and you can bet your bottom dollar somebody will hook that much to one. Thats a lot of weight and I just about promise 10 mpg or less is not out of the question. Maybe even less. If it cant do it then Ford should not rate it that high. So many variables with drivers, roads, hills, and on and on. The recent test of the 5L towing 9K got 9.5 mpg. I think they flogged it pretty hard but it is what it is. I dont expect the EB to be significantly any better on gas loaded to the gills. Unloaded I will give it the nod.
 

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Just a theory, but the EPA fuel economy drive cycles are run with a full tank. It's possible that the extra 65 lbs in gasoline would have dropped either the city or highway (or both) cycles by 1 mpg on the sticker, which is extremely valuable from a marketing position.

Similarly, I know that the orginal Ford Escape Hybrid had a "rated capacity" on the fuel tank (and stop trigger for the gas pump) that was below the max orignal capacity, because if it were full, it would push it into the next EPA vehicle class per its weight. Heard this directly from a Ford engineer during a lecture at a univerisity some 5 years ago.
Thats very interesting. This theory has been kicked around but nobody can or will confirm it. Its like a dirty secret. I guess though it begs the question why they cant make the big tank an option if what you say is true and try to skirt the epa with the smaller one? They take the highest geared rear ends to the tests. I have read a lot about it but never got a clear cut answer from anybody.
 

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Thats very interesting. This theory has been kicked around but nobody can or will confirm it. Its like a dirty secret. I guess though it begs the question why they cant make the big tank an option if what you say is true and try to skirt the epa with the smaller one? They take the highest geared rear ends to the tests. I have read a lot about it but never got a clear cut answer from anybody.
It wouldn't surprise me especially with the government forcing EPA numbers to increase. I wouldn't call it a dirty little secret just doing what you have to do to play the game.
 

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I can't imagine getting only 200 miles on a tank using the EcoBoost motor, because I can't imagine getting only 10mpg towing, unless you are driving real hard and past the tow/haul limits. I have towed many things, although nothing past 10K, but I do know that plenty of torque is your friend, even for fuel economy. And if you do this frequently, I am not so sure the V6 is for you, nor is the F-150. Perhaps you need a SD Diesel, that will save you money and will tow much easier. Ford must have had a reason for the lack of a larger tank. Shame however for some.



So either
In latetest road test, Mike Levine at pickuptrucks.com averaged 8.3 mpg with a 9,000 lb trailer. With the acceleration tests removed the average was 8.5 mpg.

Ford says not to let the tank go down below 1/4 tank, so using 8.5 that would mean you would have to fill the tank every 165 miles with the 26 gallon tank.

They did go on a pretty hard strech of road, but the highest mpg during the entire trip towing was 9.64 mpg. Most of the time it was averaging 8-9 mpg.

http://news.pickuptrucks.com/2011/04/road-test-review-2011-ford-f-150-fx2-35-liter-ecoboost-v-6-part-1.html
 
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