Ford Inside News banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Mercury C557
Joined
·
22,734 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
GM is making a $30,000 electric car called the Chevrolet Bolt - TheVerge
By Josh Lowensohn
on January 10, 2015

....The new car will compete squarely with Tesla's Model 3, which was announced in June, and itself is designed to take on BMW's 3 series. Tesla has said only that the car will be 20 percent smaller than the Model S, and go for more than 200 miles on a charge when it arrives in 2017. The Bolt would also trump Chevy's own Spark, which is also fully electric, but only has a range of 82 miles. By comparison, the 200 mile range the Bolt is said to get would bring it closer to many gasoline-powered vehicles....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,401 Posts
The first Volt came out amidst the bankruptcy and all the negativity that entailed, now the second generation Volt is set to debut to $2 gasoline. Talk about crappy luck!!!

I would much rather have a range extended vehicle like the Volt than all electric like the Model S or Bolt.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
This is supposed to be a compact CUV/wagon type vehicle, which makes it more practical as a second vehicle in a household.
 

·
Mercury C557
Joined
·
22,734 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
GM’s Ready to Lose $9,000 a Pop and Chase the Electric Car Boom
Bloomberg

David Welch & John Lippert - November 30, 2016


General Motors Co. stands to lose as much as $9,000 on every Chevrolet Bolt that leaves a showroom once the all-electric subcompact starts rolling out. Sounds crazy, but...

...Where it’ll get interesting is over the next decade or so. The [Cali] states’ rules are set to tighten so that zero-emission vehicles, or ZEVs, will have to rise to an estimated 15.4 percent of sales by 2025, some five times the current level.

The hurdles may go higher: Brown, a Democrat with two years left in his term, signed a law ordering greenhouse-gas emissions be 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. To get there, ZEVs, plug-in hybrids or fuel-cell cars like Honda Motor Co.’s Clarity may have to comprise 40 percent of sales, up from about 3 percent now, according to California Air Resources Board staff projections.

Can that really happen? “The idea that automakers will sell 40 percent of their vehicles at a loss in California is ludicrous,” said Eric Noble, president of the CarLab, a consulting company in Orange, California, who reckons most electric cars lose at least $10,000 per sale...
.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
^....that $9,000 comes from an 'unnamed source', just like it did for the Volt, and they were wrong then. Their error was trying to amortize the cost of battery technology on one vehicle and one generation of that vehicle. Kinda like trying to tie all the developmental expenses of a new gasoline engine to one vehicle and one generation of that vehicle. I remember that GM had to set them straight and explain how the auto industry works. This is petroleum friendly group trying to create negative press for EVs that are increasingly displacing combustion engine vehicles.
 

·
Mercury C557
Joined
·
22,734 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
^ well Bloggin, NOT that I put that much credence in Bloomberg
anymore BUT
posted them as the origin of an FB link I saw from
AutolineDaily

who^which
doesn't offer any evidence for THEIR comment that at least GM's $9k is
less than "the 14 Thousand Dollars that Fiat loses on every 500e"


:angel fwiw

- - - - - - -

"It's complicated"
AutoVerdict

today (Thurs)
 

·
Mercury C557
Joined
·
22,734 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Re: b b bb B... b b bb B... b b bb B...

Alex On Autos @ facebook

That’s not 2:15AM tomorrow, the Bolt won’t be charged until Tuesday morning, assuming I don’t drive it. I get asked frequently whether or not you should buy a home charging station for your electric car, the answer is yes unless you really can handle extremely long charging sessions.

.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
Re: b b bb B... b b bb B... b b bb B...

Alex On Autos @ facebook

That’s not 2:15AM tomorrow, the Bolt won’t be charged until Tuesday morning, assuming I don’t drive it. I get asked frequently whether or not you should buy a home charging station for your electric car, the answer is yes unless you really can handle extremely long charging sessions.

.
Yep...must be plugged into a 110 outlet that offers 3-4 miles per hour of charge. A 220volt at about 25 miles per hour is mandatory for home charging with the 200+ mile EVs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
One of the drawbacks to fast charging, is battery life degradation. The faster it charges, the more stress on the battery and the shorter the life span.
That was more of an issue with the early first gen battery packs, especially with Leaf that has no thermal protection. But today, the new packs can handle up to 300 Quick Charger cycles before the vehicle will slow the charge rate when the battery is cold, and when the pack is just about full. This is all to increase the life of the battery pack for the long them, whether it's DC charging or Level 2 at home. However, it's very rare for someone to have such a high DC charger rate for a few reasons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,940 Posts
That was more of an issue with the early first gen battery packs, especially with Leaf that has no thermal protection. But today, the new packs can handle up to 300 Quick Charger cycles before the vehicle will slow the charge rate when the battery is cold, and when the pack is just about full. This is all to increase the life of the battery pack for the long them, whether it's DC charging or Level 2 at home. However, it's very rare for someone to have such a high DC charger rate for a few reasons.
Not much has changed, actually. At least according to the site below, which seems to know batteries quite well.

So if you travel with your EV, it is not suggested to fast charge too much. That is quite a hassle.

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/ultra_fast_chargers
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,893 Posts
Not much has changed, actually. At least according to the site below, which seems to know batteries quite well.

So if you travel with your EV, it is not suggested to fast charge too much. That is quite a hassle.

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/ultra_fast_chargers
It looks like their focus is more about Ultra-Fast Charging, that's primarily used on commercial trains, and the new city buses, etc. For consumer vehicles, Fast Charging or DC charging of at least 300 charge cycles is a threshold before the power is throttled back a bit to preserve the longevity of the battery pack and range. Which would be about 6 years of ALL DC fast charging before an adjustment would be needed.

Which would indicate that the twice-yearly road trip with the EV, and if there is a need to use a DC fast charger, the owner would have over 100 theoretical years of DC fast charging before the software regulates the charge speed....still without any range degradation due to using the DC fast charger.

I would expect it would be the new upcoming long distance EV tractor trailers that may need consistent DC charging that should have this issue resolved before launch. But the short run delivery eVans Ford is working(and DHL is building now) on in China should not have to worry about too much DC charging since the routes should be within the range of the initial charge, since the daily urban routes for UPS/Fex-EX range from 50-70 miles with lots of stops between with a 100+ mile battery pack.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top