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Courtesy of Autoblog.com
Link: http://www.autoblog.com/2009/08/31/beware-the-scorpion-2011-ford-super-duty-gets-all-new-6-7-liter/

Ford's issues with its long-time heavy duty diesel engine supplier Navistar will soon be coming to an end. The 2011 edition of the Ford Super Duty pickup will get an all-new diesel V8 designed in-house code-named Scorpion. So now, if Ford has any durability issues with its big diesels, it will have no one to blame but itself.

Officially the Scorpion retains the Power Stroke badge, but that and eight cylinders in a V-configuration are all that is carried over. The Scorpion engine picks up a variety of technologies that have been appearing on other recent engines, both gas- and diesel-fueled, as well as adding a few new tricks, particularly the turbocharger. The biggest change for the architecture is the move to an inside-out layout. Since the early days of the V-engine configuration, most examples have had the intake system mounted in the valley between the banks with the exhaust on the outside. Like BMW's new turbocharged gas V8 and GM's current on-the-shelf Duramax 4500, the Scorpion switches this around. Read on after the jump to learn more.

There is more on the Autoblog website, but did not post it because there is a lot of information that we might not all be interested in.
 

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Since I already see a fair number of Power Stroke diesels here, I'm sure I'll hear all about the problems with the new ones if there are any. Unless, of course, people start to buy the very ugly, I mean thrifty Mahindra diesel trucks advertised on this page...
 

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I hope this is the begining of a new line of diesel engines from Ford. I have not driven diesel to date, but everyone (VW) is saying they are better. I live in way upstate NY more close to Canada than Albany, and I heard about Diesels having issues with starting in cold weather.
 

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Part of the Navistar alliance is done...now on to a Ford developed LCF and F-6 and 750.
You mean to tell me that the F-650 & F-750 are not Ford in-house projects? Did Ford build the Aeromax class 8 semi themselves or was that a joint venture too? And here I was thinking Ford can build the big trucks with no help.
 

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f650 and F-750 as well as the LCF are joint ventures with Navistar.
BOOOOOOOOO!!!!! :(

Time Warp !

The answer to your question is YES, Ford did design and build the AeroMax, back in 1988 before the whole HD truck division was sold off by Jaq Nassar.
Which oddly enough was bought by DaimlerChrysler in...2004?..2005?...& renamed Sterling then closed (WTF?). That didn't make sense since Daimler owns Freightliner & Western Star. I asked about the Aeromax because we have a picture of one at my work.
 

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Which oddly enough was bought by DaimlerChrysler in...2004?..2005?...& renamed Sterling
Folks check your facts !

From Wikipedia topic Sterling Trucks

Sterling is a subsidiary of Daimler Trucks North America Portland, Oregon. As such, it is a member of the Daimler AG. It was originally the heavy truck division of Ford Motor Company, purchased and rebranded in 1997.​
 

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Folks check your facts !

From Wikipedia topic Sterling Trucks

Sterling is a subsidiary of Daimler Trucks North America Portland, Oregon. As such, it is a member of the Daimler AG. It was originally the heavy truck division of Ford Motor Company, purchased and rebranded in 1997.​
While I don't rely on Wikipedia for the most reliable information, I wasn't watching the news the day that Daimler bought Ford's class 8 line.
 

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Re: Beware the (CURIOUSLY QUIET) Scorpion!

FORD'S ALL-NEW DIESEL IS CURIOUSLY QUIET - Media.FORD.com

((VIDEO: Quiet New Ford 6.7-liter Power Stroke Turbocharged Diesel Engine))

DEARBORN, Mich., Sept. 23, 2009 – People who know diesel engines are familiar with, and expect, the noisy clatter generally associated with diesels. That is, until now. When Ford's new 6.7-liter Power Stroke® diesel engine debuts in the 2011 Super Duty lineup, it's expected to be the quietest, smoothest diesel on the market, outperforming its closest competitors by several decibels.

Engineering and design improvements to the all-new Ford-engineered, Ford-tested and Ford-built 6.7-liter Power Stroke® turbocharged diesel engine – debuting in the 2011 F-Series Super Duty – eliminate the harsh sounds of the typical diesel to make it one of the quietest and smoothest diesels on the market. Significantly quieter than its toughest competitor, the 6.7-liter diesel challenges traditional views about how diesels should sound.

"Historically, consumer perception has been that diesels should sound rough and tough, but from a sound quality perspective they were actually loud and unrefined," said Scott DeRaad, engine NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) engineer. "At Ford, we approached the new diesel development as though it was more than a work truck and something that people wanted to drive, making ‘quieter' a reason to buy."

Most of the improvement in NVH comes from changes made to the combustion system and the structural integrity of the compacted graphite iron block, as well as from mounting one turbocharger on the engine block instead of two.

Specific design upgrades were made to both the piston and the piston bowl to optimize the combustion process, which features a two-stage combustion event instead of a single-injection event, causing harsh, sudden and loud combustion. Instead, a starter or pilot injection of fuel begins the compression process before the main injection.

The result is a smoother combustion and a more refined sound for the customer. When at idle, two pilot injection events are used to make the firing process even smoother and aid in quietness. The "ticking" of the high-speed injectors also is masked by specially designed covers on the engine.

Mounting the turbocharger from the center housing directly to the block provided several advantages as well in terms of NVH performance.

"When turbochargers vibrate, it can lead to other parts of the vehicle vibrating," said DeRaad. "The exhaust system, for example, is directly attached to the turbocharger. So when the turbocharger vibrates a lot, the exhaust system vibrates too and that's disturbing to the customer. Bolting the turbocharger directly to the block eliminates that concern."

Using one turbocharger, instead of two operating in series or sequentially, helped solve some NVH challenges as well.

"Having one turbocharger eliminates the air-handling noises – the whooshes – as the engine switches from one turbo to the next turbo," DeRaad said. "Our turbocharger also has ball bearings that pilot the shaft in the turbo, which helps eliminate the potential for the shaft of the turbocharger to gyrate in its housing, which can create noise."

Other improvements include the addition of two resonators in the intake system as well as a third resonator near the air cleaner.

"We've been able to tune the diesel intake system to give us the sound we wanted," DeRaad said. "It's now a nice complement to the engine."

The new diesel will also deliver other significant improvements including better torque and horsepower, class-leading fuel economy and best-in-class towing and payload for unparalleled performance.
 
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