Ford Inside News banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Sponsored Editorial Content
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

GM is pushing its North American midsize trucks into uncharted territory with the addition of a new 2.8-liter four-cylinder diesel that the company says will help its truck twins claim a number of best-in-class stats.

Both the Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon will get the new engine, which has been in development for more than eight years. The engine is built in Thailand and is currently available in global versions of the trucks. GM estimates that the U.S. versions of the small four-cylinder diesel will make around 181 HP and 369 lb-ft of torque.

That means the diesel puts out more twist than the 269 lb-ft available from the 3.6-liter V6, and is nearly equivalent to the 383 lb-ft found in the 5.3-liter V8 available in the Silverado and Sierra. More importantly, GM promises that these diesel-powered small trucks will claim best-in-class fuel economy. Something north of 30 mpg is a safe assumption for combined fuel economy.

Towing is clearly a focus for these trucks, as every single diesel-equipped Colorado and Canyon will come with an integrated trailer brake controller and a hitch receiver, a combination that GM promises will be able to provide best-in-class towing numbers.

Many of the engine parts used in the international versions of the truck, such as the the cast iron block, pistons, cylinder heads, and connecting rods are identical, though the two versions aren’t exactly the same. Extreme heat and cold weather conditions were both taken into account for North America, which resulted in a larger cooling fan and ceramic glow plugs. Better operation at high altitude is taken care of by a new variable geometry turbo.

Reducing noise, vibration and harshness was also a priority for the North American market. A new centrifugal pendulum absorber was added to the six-speed automatic transmission to help managed torque fluctuations, keeping power flow smooth.

The last part of the equation is cost. GM says that the diesel will be available on mid-trim crew cab trucks, though a base Work Truck version with a diesel is being considered, mainly for fleet customers. Take rate on the diesel is estimated to be roughly 10 percent of all sales.

The introduction of the Colorado and Canyon seems to have invigorated the entire midsize truck segment, which has grown by 51 percent year-to-date compared to last year. The Toyota Tacoma still leads the segment with a total of 73,000 units sold through May of this year, but GM is not too far behind with 48,000 sold in the same time frame.

Because the models we drove at this preview event were development mules, we aren’t permitted to talk about driving impressions, but stay tuned for our full review coming soon.
For more stories like this one, Chevrolet Colorado Diesel Promises Best-in-Class Towing, Torque please visit AutoGuide.com.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,121 Posts
These two trucks are killing me because I've always been the anti-GM, but I cant help but to want one. They look nice, have a diesel, and arent giant. The fact that they cant keep up with demand should tell Ford something about the segment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
The remarkable thing to me is that they're not cannibalizing Silverado/Sierra sales, at least to this point. Mary Barra and Mark Reuss are looking pretty smart right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,057 Posts
Badhac, I couldn't agree more, I want a smaller truck but I'm anti-GM as far as spending my own money but these trucks are tempting.

VOD, I'm sure high incentives have something to do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,961 Posts
10% projected take rate on a small volume truck (relatively) is not much. My guess, a $45K price tag for a modestly equipped 4x4 truck will help to keep that 10% in check. I’m all for Ford introducing a small truck for those who want small, but if you are spending this kind of coin to save money, you are barking up the wrong segment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Badhac, I couldn't agree more, I want a smaller truck but I'm anti-GM as far as spending my own money but these trucks are tempting.

VOD, I'm sure high incentives have something to do with it.
I'm sure GM having more flexibility on half-ton pricing does play a role in their ongoing sales growth, in much the same way Ford's frame vendor's ongoing inability to produce adequate frames puts additional pressure on Dearborn to get a profit out of them. But that's neither here nor there as far as the Canyonado goes, I suspect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,961 Posts
I'm sure GM having more flexibility on half-ton pricing does play a role in their ongoing sales growth, in much the same way Ford's frame vendor's ongoing inability to produce adequate frames puts additional pressure on Dearborn to get a profit out of them. But that's neither here nor there as far as the Canyonado goes, I suspect.
Voice of Drama,
it is indeed neither here nor there, but that has not stopped you from repeating it now what is quite possibly, several hundred times over the course of several weeks, across many sites. And lest anyone think I am exaggerating, than you just don't know drama.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Yes, well. Whatever.

So, onward: with the announcement of this diesel, GM has basically said "screw Toyota, Nissan, and whoever wants to join the party. We're playing for all the marbles, and we're not gonna mail it in anymore." An attitude which is probably overdue, but given the resources of the outfit finally saying it, formidable.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top