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The Spaminator
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Ford Taurus and Explorer Police Interceptor production begins
By Zach Bowman
Feb 22nd 2012
Autoblog

Ford has begun producing the company's two new Police Interceptor models. According to Ward's Auto, both the Taurus and Explorer-based cruisers are rolling off of the line at the automaker's Chicago Assembly Plant. All told, the sedan variant has accounted for around 60 percent of orders so far. Currently, the law enforcement market is Ford's to lose: Dearborn has controlled up to 70 percent of police car sales in the U.S. with its now defunct Crown Victoria in the past, but General Motors has made it clear it wants a larger slice of that pie.

GM has given law enforcement agencies an alternative to the two Interceptors from Ford with its Caprice PPV and Tahoe law enforcement SUV. Even so, Ford remains confident it will stay on top of the police market. The company says that early orders indicate it will remain the segment leader.

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As replacements for the CVPI, these two vehicles are pretty good offering better fuel economy, more power, and better traction with AWD. I would've preferred it if Ford had used the roomier previous gen Taurus for police use only along side the newly redesigned civilian model. The new one model offers substantially less passenger and cargo space in exchange for a sportier look. The route they went wasn't bad but with a cage installed, getting prisoners in back won't be as easy as it is in the CVPIs and they aren't huge either. It would've made more sense if the Sedan and the Utility shared the exact same drive train, the 3.7L V6. Instead, the car has the 280 HP 3.5L V6 and the SUV has the 300 HP 3.7L. The Taurus and Explorer don't offer the 3.7L normally so if Ford was going to go the extra step to put it in the PI Utility, it might as well have put it in the PI Sedan too , making it the PI engine. That the two PIs share so many other things was a smart move. Now agencies can have a mixed fleet but their motor pool can stock only one type of brake pads, brake discs, belts, oil, air filters, hoses, etc. In addition, their mechanics need to be trained on only one type of vehicle - another cost savings. If the state bid for the PI Utility is not substantially more than the PI Sedan or the Charger or Caprice PPV, then Ford will likely sell 60% of their PIs as Sedans and 40% as Utilities - purely my estimate.

You may have noticed that I didn't mention the twin turbo Ecoboost engine above. That was done purposely as its sales will be minute in the big picture. I highly doubt that chiefs will be willing to ask city councils and village boards to approve the extra cost (retail $2890) for the EB engine when its only benefit is to go faster especially when so many departments have cut budgets by downsizing through layoffs and attrition. Besides, the naturally aspirated 280 HP AWD V6 with the 6 speed automatic is quicker and faster (not to mention considerably more fuel efficient) than the 250 HP 4.6L V8 backed by a 4 speed automatic in the CVPI. The CVPI was the industry standard and, therefore at least adequate, and the new non-turbo PI Sedan beats it in most every category. So why spend a substantial amount of money unnecessarily when most municipalities are already struggling with their budgets? For those who are quick to say, "What about Highway Patrol and State Police Officers who need the extra power to prevent pursuits?" I provide the same argument. Since the CVPI has done fine for years with only 210-250 HP and the new one will out-perform it with less mass and 30 more HP, there's no real justification for the additional nearly $3000.

Dodge might be in a similar situation unless the optional Hemi 368 HP V8 costs not that much more than the standard V6 with nearly 300 HP. The main reason Chevy will sell a lot of the V8s verses the V6s is that the bigger engine is a no cost option and a good administrator will be able to educate those who hold the purse strings that real world fuel economy will be virtually identical between these two engines negating any clear advantage of the V6.
 

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I wish the black police wheels were available options for the public. They would look so tight on a base mustang.
 

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Mercury C557
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^ yup - those big steelies are hot


...I would've preferred it if Ford had used the roomier previous gen Taurus for police use only along side the newly redesigned civilian model. The new one model offers substantially less passenger and cargo space in exchange for a sportier look...
YUP

tho
you got me thinking, T'Cal,
would it have been better to put all the eggs into the Explorer basket? - thinking with more volume if cost could've come down a bit without touching profit?
tho2
thinking some police depts are "hide bound" enough to be unable to think past a sedan for some missions


City of Chicago Places Order for 500 Next-Generation Ford Police Interceptors - money.msn.com
February 24, 2012 1:08 PM ET



they don't break down how many sedans/SCUVs
 

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Mercury C557
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ya know,
since the Chicago plant is scheduled (so far) to build cop vehicles thru the end of 2016
but the Taurus WAS supposed to move to CD4+ before then (not a sure thing anymore imho)
an Explorer-Only Interceptor could still happen
otoh
wonder what $5 or $6 gas would(will) do to LEO vehicles choices?


second thought
just maybe the 2.3EB (which could make 280hp easily - over 300hp if they want it to) will be a game changer?
Wonder if that engine is a reason for them to postpone a new Taurus??
altho
I could also see a Taurus Interceptor with the "Powered by Lincoln" 2.7v6, EB or non
AND
even a 2.7 Plug-In Hybrid:
Wonder if Fomoco has polled LEO Depts about how they'd feel about installing Plug-In stations at every precinct?
 

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I was told that Ford announced pricing approval for the 2013 Taurus yesterday, since they have been building this car for almost 3 weeks at Chicago Assembly... but there still is no posting on the Ford website for employee pricing. Anyone know when Ford will post employee pricing? Edmunds.com has the estimated MSRP for the 2013 Taurus..but I want employee pricing. Nobody at Ford Media can tell me.
 

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Any way a retail customer can order a Explorer PPV (without the light bar or spotters, of course)? Pant...pant...want.
 

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I was surprised to get pulled over the other day by a Ford Taurus in Charlestown R.I.
Ahh a fellow RI'er!

I haven't seen the new Taurus PI, but I have seen a 5th Gen Taurus Police car the 08-09 model on the East Greenwich Warwick line near Goddard Park. had the lights hidden between the 3 bar grille
 

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I've seen a few of the last gen Taurus converted to administrative squads in black in suburban Chicago and they look very good. No marked ones, though.
 

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Well, I saw my first production PI Utility today at a local place that stripes emergency and commercial vehicles. I know the staff there and one came out while I was eying the as yet unmarked blue SUV. It looks lowered compared to my '11 Explorer and it probably is a combination of a modified suspension and 18" wheels/tire as compared to my 20's. It looks great and I can't wait to see it fully decked out. I wish it had more than only a tach, a speedo, and a fuel gauge especially since the tach is not as important as an engine temperature gauge or an oil pressure gauge. Does anyone know if the small LCD screen offers any type of additional engine status info? I did examine the cargo area where the third row is replaced by a coated floor. When I removed the panel I saw some stout bracing, which will no doubt make this a very strong chassis. I didn't drive it but with the larger, torquier 3.7L it might be pretty quick especially if the PI package weighs less than a standard civilain model. Mine could use a little more dig off the line although passing power is strong. The worker told me this was their second PI Utility in two weeks and that they had a PI Sedan before that.
 

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The Spaminator
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Discussion Starter #13
Ford Police Interceptor Utility is California Highway Patrol's Next Cruiser

By Scott Evans
May 25, 2012
MotorTrend

With the legendary Ford Crown Victoria-based Police Interceptor no longer in production, it's no surprise that the California Highway Patrol (CHP) has been searching for an all-new vehicle to replenish its fleet. What is surprising is the vehicle the CHP chose -- the Explorer-based Ford Police Interceptor Utility. Look for it in your rearview mirror beginning early next year.

While a win for Ford, the CHP's selection of an SUV is a potentially troubling sign for the much-hyped cop car offerings the Detroit Three have been pitching hard to fill the void left by the departure of the Crown Vic. And there's a good reason why: payload.

While the old-school, body-on-frame Crown Victoria may have been a rolling tank, the suitors to its throne are all modern unibodies. That may make them lighter and safer, but it doesn't increase their carrying capacity. In fact, it seems to have lowered it, because while the Crown Vic had no trouble carrying all the CHP's gear, the Taurus-based Police Interceptor Sedan, Dodge Charger Pursuit, and Chevrolet Caprice PPV all lack the necessary payload capacity.

The CHP insists that its cruisers be able to safely carry all their equipment plus four fully equipped officers. In all, the CHP says that can add up to roughly 1700 pounds. That's a problem for the new crop of police sedans, because the beefiest of them, Ford's Police Interceptor Sedan, can only carry about 1200 pounds of people and gear. Simply put, the Gross Vehicle Weight Ratings of the sedans were too low to get the job done. What's a state trooper to do? Go big.

With all the sedans out of the running, it was up to the SUVs. In fact, it was only a two-vehicle race. While the CHP received a number of bids from various dealers, only the Ford Police Interceptor Utility (PI Utility) and the Chevrolet Tahoe PPV vehicles were submitted for consideration. The Dodge Durango Special Service, having arrived late to the game and without a "pursuit" rating, was not submitted. Despite using Tahoes in the past, the CHP selected the Police Interceptor Utility based on the lowest bids.

Ford says that orders for its new generation of police vehicles are currently running 60-40 in favor of the sedan, though the CHP's planned order of 1800 PI Utility vehicles over the next two years may shift that balance. Per Ford, two of the largest markets for police vehicles in the U.S. are California and Texas, and the CHP's decision carries some weight with other departments. The CHP says its bid process essentially clears the vehicle for use by other state departments as well, so local law enforcement and other government agencies within California will likely follow the CHP's lead. Those other agencies, though, also have the option of purchasing the Police Interceptor Sedan. For the first time ever, the CHP split its bid into two line items, one for the sedan and one for the SUV. While the CHP will only be using the SUV (it may order a few sedans for executive vehicles), it will sign off on the sedan so that other departments can use it. Any way you slice it, it's a big win for Ford.

The CHP's vehicle acquisition process, though, seems a bit convoluted. When the CHP decides to buy a new vehicle, it informs the Department of General Services (DGS), which opens a bidding process. DGS is responsible for accepting and vetting the bids and awarding a contract. Once DGS has accepted a bid, the winner must provide two test vehicles to the CHP within 14 days. In other words, the CHP doesn't actually test the vehicles until after the bid has been awarded. Of course, to be considered in the first place, the vehicles must be pursuit rated by a trusted agency, such as the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department or the Michigan State Police.

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Mercury C557
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Re: Ford Police Interceptor Utility is California Highway Patrol's Next Cruiser

...The CHP insists that its cruisers be able to safely carry all their equipment plus four fully equipped officers. In all, the CHP says that can add up to roughly 1700 pounds. That's a problem for the new crop of police sedans, because the beefiest of them, Ford's Police Interceptor Sedan, can only carry about 1200 pounds of people and gear. Simply put, the Gross Vehicle Weight Ratings of the sedans were too low to get the job done...
imho
(& that's all it is)
two 350 lb suspects - not at ALL farfetched
plus two 250 lb cops - ^ditto^
= 1200 lbs without ANY equipment

I really wonder if
- mfgs are under-rating their cars (same for towing capability)
or
- under building/designing them
 

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Re: Ford Police Interceptor Utility is California Highway Patrol's Next Cruiser

This is likely the most direct replacement for the CVPI. I realize the Caprice PPV is a big, RWD V8 powered sedan like the CVPI but it's made outside of North America and that means it's foreign, deliveries will take longer, and parts availability could be a real concern. The PI Sedan & Utility are the most American products you can buy right now. The Sedan might be too small for many agencies. The Dodge Charger Police Pack is a great vehicle with lots of updates but it still has a stigma to get past from those who had bad experiences with the last iteration, which is a shame. With AWD, 300HP, and lots of room for passengers and cargo, the PI Utility is the winner.
 

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Re: Ford Police Interceptor Utility is California Highway Patrol's Next Cruiser

... the Caprice PPV is a big, RWD V8 powered sedan like the CVPI but it's made outside of North America and that means it's foreign, deliveries will take longer, and parts availability could be a real concern...
also
How Long before GM gives up on making/importing it AGAIN?
 

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Re: Ford Police Interceptor Utility is California Highway Patrol's Next Cruiser

If I were the fleet manager of a municipality or L/E agency, I would avoid a car that will be replaced in just a couple of years. IF that is truly the case.

One of the main reasons the CVPI was so popular was that it stayed the same for so many years. For commercial vehicles, that's a path to a quick death, but for a fleet vehicle, that's a godsend. The mechanics don't need constant retraining, only updates. Motor Pools can save money by purchasing maintenance pieces in bulk (tires, brake pads, rotors, belts, oil, other fluids, etc.). When an old car is replaced by a new one that is identical, parts that are put in the new ones come out and bolt right in without modification saving time and money.
 

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Interceptor News

Today, Ford reports that the 2013 PI Sedan will drop the NA 3.5L V6 in favor of the 3.7L V6. What a great idea!

http://www.fordinsidenews.com/forum...3-Taurus-version&p=43565&viewfull=1#post43565

The 300HP 3.7L makes the Ecoboost 3.5L V6 unnecessary in the PI Sedan. If the heavier CVPI with only 250HP was adequate, the lighter AWD PI Sedan will have plenty of power without the very expen$ive turbo option. I love horsepower but I'm always surprised to read that agencies are spending the extra thousands per unit only to go faster in economic times that are so bad that staffing levels are lower and cops are being laid off. The 3.7L offers better balance as well as lower production costs since it will be the same engine as the one in the PI Utility.
 
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