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If the words “Ford Mondeo powered by 1.0-L 3-cylinder EcoBoost engine” sound a bit incongruent, now consider that the company is researching cylinder deactivation for its little triple.

Ford, working with European partners, has examined both single and “rolling” deactivation strategies for its smallest spark-ignited passenger car engine. After proving itself in the B- and C-segment Fiesta and Focus models, the 92-kW (123-hp), 1.0-L—smaller than many motorcycle engines—is now also available in the D-segment Mondeo in Europe.
http://articles.sae.org/14204/
 

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Mercury C557
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and I Love the idea of every-other firing
BUT
...Schamel explained that on a 3-cylinder engine, different strategies for cylinder deactivation are applicable. One "is to apply an appropriate valve deactivation mechanism to one cylinder," effectively creating a 666-cc twin but with the disadvantage of an uneven firing sequence. However, Ford has investigated other technologies which provide the freedom to vary the number and the sequence of deactivated cylinders.

Such a set-up offers the opportunity for a rolling cylinder deactivation and could be used to run the engine in half-engine mode, corresponding to a 500-cm3 active displacement but now with the advantage of an even firing order, he noted in the paper.

The research teams found that the half-engine mode offered a greater potential of avoiding throttle losses at very low loads, but at an overall lower load limit compared to the two-thirds mode. Schamel added: “In the operating area in which the two deactivation strategies overlap, the rolling cylinder deactivation shows a bigger fuel saving potential related to the full engine operation compared to fixed cylinder activation.”

The fuel economy for the 1.0-L engine during rolling cylinder deactivation would be better than that for the fixed cylinder deactivation in low load drive cycles, but the magnitude of the additional benefit would depend on vehicle application and cycle. A small car at light load would get the biggest potential benefit, with smallest achieved by a large car during mid to high load cycle. So a Fiesta with a 1.0-L engine would be able to gain another 1.2% fuel efficiency benefit in NEDC compared to the improvement already achieved with fixed cylinder deactivation. But for a Mondeo using the engine the gain would be negligible in the WLTP (Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure) cycle, considered to be more representative of real-world driving...

sounds to me like some kind of hybrid could give much better mpg improvement
 
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