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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #61
Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

since autonoM.O.U.S.E.y will at least start out as a mix of human & robot...
...until the latter replace the former


National Weather Service:
No East Coast tsunami warning

From Associated Press
February 06, 2018 10:05 AM EST


Some people on the East Coast got a push alert on their phones Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, about a tsunami warning, but the National Weather Service says it was just a test. Meteorologist Hendricus Lulofs said there was a glitch Tuesday during a routine test. (AP Photo - Jeremy DaRos)

A routine National Weather Service test on Tuesday resulted in a false push notification to mobile phones about a tsunami warning, giving jolt to many residents on the East Coast.

A glitch meant some people received what looked like an actual warning, NWS meteorologist Hendricus Lulofs said. The National Weather Service is trying to sort what went wrong, he said.

Officials said it appeared to be an issue with the popular Accuweather app. Accuweather didn't immediately return a call seeking comment.

Jeremy DaRos, of Portland, Maine, said the alert made him "jump" because he lives a stone's throw from the water and was aware of recent spate of small earthquakes that made the alert seem plausible.

"Looking out the window and seeing the ocean puts you in a different frame of mind when you get a tsunami warning," he said. He said that after clicking on the push notification for details he realized it was just a test.

This is the latest in a spate of false alarms in the past month.

A Hawaii state employee mistakenly sent an alert warning of a ballistic missile attack on Jan. 13. And, a malfunction triggered sirens at a North Carolina nuclear power plant on Jan. 19.

:facepalm:
 

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #62
Shhh... the autonoM.O.U.S.E.y BOONDOGGLE is s'posed to be secret!!

Uber and Lyft want you banned
from using your own self-driving car in urban areas

SiliconBeat
/ Ethan Baron / February 2, 2018

The rabble can’t be trusted with self-driving cars, and only companies operating fleets of them should be able to use them in dense urban areas.

So say Uber and Lyft, as signatories to a new list of transportation goals developed by a group of international non-governmental organizations and titled “Shared Mobility Principles for Livable Cities.”

Long-considered a futuristic dream, self-driving cars are quickly moving toward widespread deployment, with many companies testing them on California public roads and Google spin-off Waymo planning to launch public ride-sharing with self-driving minivans in Phoenix this year.

In the list of 10 shared-mobility principles, bland generalities predominate — “stakeholder engagement” for example, is considered important — but the groups responsible clearly saved the best for last: According to Principle No. 10, the signatories — which also include other companies involved in transportation as a service — agree that autonomous vehicles in “dense urban areas” should only be operated in fleets.


In language reminiscent of the Second Amendment, Principle No. 10 says it’s “critical” that all self-driving vehicles are “part of shared fleets, well-regulated, and zero emission.”

Here’s why you, dear reader, ought not to be allowed to toodle around downtown San Francisco or central San Jose (or probably anywhere in between if the ride-hailing giants had their druthers) in your own self-driving car, according to Principle No. 10:

“Shared fleets can provide more affordable access to all, maximize public safety and emissions benefits, ensure that maintenance and software upgrades are managed by professionals.”

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Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

The next step will be that you cant own a car...

P.S.: I´m beginning to understand Hackett´s speech: "I´m not here to sell cars".

:facepalm:
 

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Discussion Starter #64 (Edited)
Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

^ except the 2nd Amendment will make that difficult ...+IED's = "pry the steeringwheel out of my cold, dead hands"

- - - - - - -
meanwhile
via a broad range of topics @ AutolineDetroit / video: a verbal link to

The Electric Car Tipping Point
BostonConsultingGroup
- JANUARY 11, 2018
By Xavier Mosquet , Hadi Zablit , Andreas Dinger , Gang Xu , Michelle Andersen , and Kazutoshi Tominaga


This report is part of BCG’s research on the future of automotive, a series of publications focusing on new technologies that are transforming the industry. Here, we examine the evolution of the powertrain. The Reimagined Car focused on the ways in which shared autonomous vehicles will change mobility in the US. A future publication will look at the impact of technological change on the profit pools of an automotive-based mobility industry...

- - - LONG ARTICLE - - -



- - - added graphic - - -




_______________________

a u t o n o M. O. U. S. E.y

FORD ...GOING FURTHER... so You doN'T have to

:facepalm:
 

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Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

spamming to make a point
...The other problem is the lack of standard (or available) emergency auto-braking which is something the Japanese and Koreans have really pioneered. But I really think IIHS should start testing those systems as well (if they haven't already), it's possible they aren't all equal...
imho this is related:
-- I do Not trust these tests - at least not automatically/completely
just like
-- I do NOT believe in the autonomous boondoggle.

imho REAL WORLD events and analysis AFTER they happen is different yet can still be a quagmire of assumptions.
Trying to have artificial situations set up to try to PREDICT application to RealWorld events withOUT a (Lack of)Confidence RATING
is just plain gullible
& asking for catastrophe(s)...
wondering about Mfgs adding a (Lack of)confidence WARNING SIGNAL
Like your vehicle announcing to you,
"umm Dave? I'm getting close to Not knowing what I'm doing... You THERE, Dave?"
:nerd: ...could be due to:
weather - snow/fog hampering HUMAN drivers' visibility
or^ covering lane markers & traffic signs
or^^ covering SENSORS
road surface getting slippery
water on road (possibly) approaching 'flooding'
road not following predicted/mapped route - unmarked road obstructions
accident detected up ahead!!
wildfire detected at side(s) of road
Human drivers acting WEIRD (against prediction)
vehicles approaching from rear at unacceptable rate of SPEED
ANY kind of flashing lights​
...
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

Self-driving cars hitting 'red lights'
AutomotiveNews
- Shiraz Ahmed - April 22, 2018


Federal and state officials, once eager advocates of self-driving cars, now are pumping the brakes and demanding greater accountability and information that autos and tech companies may not be willing to provide.

Until now, governments have been willing to let private industry ...[ stuff their pockets with cash ]...
After two high-profile fatalities related to self-driving cars, issues such as system malfunction, the limits of human attention span, and broader legal questions have ...[ opened their eyes & GREED to political payola ]...
And lawmakers suddenly are realizing how little they know about the technology ...[ or ANYthing else ]....

"It was not an issue that I knew a whole a lot about, and I was just bombarded by all sides," said Indiana Republican state Sen. Michael Crider, who oversaw the state's attempt to introduce autonomous regulation, which failed one month ago. "I'm sick of the whole topic."

Haves vs. have-nots
The divide between those with technical expertise and those without is at the root of tension...
..."It's almost as if a self-driving car is a different vehicle, a different concept entirely," said Alan Morrison, a George Washington University professor who specializes in administrative law and government regulation. "Congress doesn't know enough to even know what to do now. Neither Congress nor anybody else is stepping up to the plate and dealing with very difficult issues."

Stalled legislation
...Legislation to create a national framework governing autonomous vehicles, the AV START Act in the U.S. Senate, has been stalled since late last year because of concerns from safety advocates...

'Hyperbole'
Critics say the industry has not engaged with policymakers substantially on issues such as insurance liability, licensing and safety, instead diverting discussion to the promised future benefits of autonomous technology.

"Do your homework," said Indiana Republican state Rep. Ed Soliday, a former aviation executive who authored the state's ill-fated self-driving car bill. "Everybody's beginning to understand there's a lot of hyperbole in the vision casting for autonomous vehicles."

Soliday's bill failed because of disagreements on how self-driving car companies would be licensed and higher insurance standards they could be required to maintain.

The legislation would have created an independent group to issue reporting requirements, including information such as when and where companies would be testing, and issue and revoke licenses. Legislation in New Hampshire has run into problems for similar reasons.

"There's not a lot of trust" among the companies, said Crider, the Indiana senator. "They all have spent a lot of money to develop their technology, and they don't want it stolen."

Soliday criticized groups such as the Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets and the Auto Alliance, accusing them of working in bad faith and promoting model legislation that he believes is too broad, allowing companies to deploy on public roads with little or no advance notice to state officials.

"They basically treated us like we were stupid," said Soliday, who toured the country extensively to learn about this technology and was vice president of safety for United Airlines. "It's a very frustrating experience. They need to change their attitude."
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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #68
Re: Global: first to LEVEL 4 autonoM.O.U.S.E.y?

Autonomous Cars Without Steeringwheels Unlikely Before 2045, Says EU Transport Commissioner
FordAuthority
— Aaron Brzozowski — May 15, 2018


Despite the quick, optimistic timelines touted by Ford Motor Company and other major players in the autonomous vehicle space, self-driving vehicles without steering wheels and other controls aren’t likely to hit the roads until about 2045, according to EU Commissioner for Transport Violeta Bulc. At the FT Future of the Car Summit, Ms. Bulc said that “automated” vehicles – that is, those that can drive themselves in many circumstances, but which still possess steering wheels and other devices for human input – will likely be the norm for a period while the technology matures.

“The goal by 2030 is that we’ll be able to introduce mixed traffic, with automated and classic traffic. Automated means there’s still a steering wheel and you can take control,” Ms. Bulc said. “Probably it will take 10 or 15 years more to have autonomous mobility, which means no steering wheel. We see this happening now in campuses, very controlled streets in the cities, airports etc. And little by little this will become more acceptable.”

Ford plans to put its first fully-autonomous production vehicle without a steering wheel on the road by 2021, although it will initially be available only to commercial ride-hailing and rideshare services. Partly, this is because the technological components of the system are too expensive yet to be economically feasible for individual sale. And partly, it’s because current AV technology can only operate in every possible weather and lighting condition when the area of operation has been precisely mapped. Only deploying the car commercially ensures that it can be kept to a pre-defined, well-mapped area.

Ms. Bulc said the EU is hoping to avoid the sort of high-profile accidents that have occurred in the US, saying: “I’m not in favour of just throwing new technology into the social environment and seeing what is happening.

“We’re going to introduce, little by little, the green and autonomous technology and monitor closely what needs to be done to ensure full acceptance in the future,” she said.

(Source: Auto Express)

1 Comment
lou - May 15, 2018 at 1:11 pm
I won’t be around in 2045 but if I was I would put a steering wheel on just to P..S Them Off!!!

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #69 (Edited)
sub-title: Just a spoonful of medicine makes the sugar go down...

How a semi-autonomous Nissan Rogue made me a safer, better driver
Detroit Free Press
| Mark Phelan | May 17, 2018 | Updated May 20, 2018


...It also almost certainly also made me a more pleasant person to share the road with.

“It’s more relaxed driving,” John Maddox, president and CEO of the American Center for Mobility, the new test track for developing autonomous and driver-assistance systems in Willow Run, just west of Detroit. Maddox uses a CT6 with Super Cruise on his daily commute. “I’m less inclined to speed or weave in and out of traffic.”

Super Cruise uses digital mapping, GPS location, advanced cameras and lidar to let drivers remove their hands from the wheel for hours at a time. It’s also a $5,000 option on an already lavishly equipped luxury car. Tesla S option packages for Enhanced Auto Pilot start at $5,000.

Nissan’s prices are lower because its ambitions are less lofty. ProPilot Assist takes systems that already provide lane departure assistance and adaptive cruise control and lets them talk to each other to keep your vehicle in its lane, at the speed you set and at a safe distance behind other vehicles with almost no input from the driver. Because it uses modestly priced cameras and radar, Nissan’s system — like Tesla’s more expensive one — requires the driver to keep a hand on the wheel at all times.

Over four days of highway driving, ProPilot Assist kept me centered in my lane and maintained a safe distance from vehicles in front of me. It worked equally well in daylight and at night. White lane markings on a light-colored road surface confused it on one strip of highway, triggering alerts that told me I needed to keep the Rogue in its lane. The system also requires the driver to take control when the windshield wipers are on, because rain may obscure lane markings. ProPilot Assist will continue its lane-centering with wipers set to intermittent, however.

“It’s a partnership with the driver in a management role,” Nissan R&D manager Andy Christensen said.

“The system’s goal is to give the driver stability and confidence.”

To make sure the driver doesn’t delegate too much, Nissan limited the amount of steering force the system can apply. That means the driver has to intervene on some highway curves, particularly at higher speeds in mountains. ProPilot Assist handles most highway curves fine at posted speeds.

It took me a few miles to get used to the light touch on the wheel that lets ProPilot Assist work best, a few more miles to trust it to stay in its lane passing semis on curves, but I soon found myself relaxing behind the wheel and enjoying the ride. My fuel economy also improved, because adaptive cruise control applies acceleration more smoothly and consistently than a human can.

“Driver assistance technologies affect how people behave behind the wheel,” Honda product planning manager Jay Joseph said. “They can have a really meaningful effect on safety because they make people less likely to tailgate and weave in and out of traffic.”

Honda is making Honda Sensing, a set of features that deliver aspects of ProPilot Assist’s performance, standard across much of its model line.

As other automakers follow suit, a growing number of drivers will benefit from self-driving technology without ever experiencing an autonomous vehicle.

unrelated incident - also, unplanned for
 

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Discussion Starter #70 (Edited)
CarGurus polls about self-driving cars has surprising results
Are American drivers ready to accept autonomous cars and everything that comes along with them?
cNet/Roadshow
- Kyle Hyatt - MAY 22, 2018
...only five percent of CarGurus' survey respondents trusted Waymo to develop autonomous cars.

We hear a lot about autonomous cars and how they're the future. Automotive manufacturers are spending countless millions on their development and testing. This leaves us wondering what the average driver thinks about the advent of self-driving cars, and apparently it left CarGurus wondering the same thing, so they asked.

CarGurus is an online car shopping and research tool, and since its inception in 2006, it has published some exciting surveys and studies. For the self-driving car opinion study, CarGurus researchers contacted 1,873 vehicle owners in the US, ages 18 to 65 with a household income of over $25,000. What it learned is pretty interesting.

First, let's get the significant number out of the way: 79 percent of those surveyed said they were not excited about autonomous cars. Fully 84 percent said they wouldn't own an autonomous vehicle in the next five years, though this is less surprising to us, given where the technology is right now...

...The survey's findings on public perception of companies developing self-driving tech are also fascinating. When asked which companies are most trusted to create autonomous cars, 27 percent of respondents reported that no companies could be trusted. Interestingly, Tesla was nearly three times more likely to be trusted than Toyota and almost five times more than Waymo, one of the current leaders in developing self-driving tech...
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CarGurus polls about self-driving cars has surprising results
Are American drivers ready to accept autonomous cars and everything that comes along with them?
cNet/Roadshow
- Kyle Hyatt - MAY 22, 2018
...only five percent of CarGurus' survey respondents trusted Waymo to develop autonomous cars.

We hear a lot about autonomous cars and how they're the future. Automotive manufacturers are spending countless millions on their development and testing. This leaves us wondering what the average driver thinks about the advent of self-driving cars, and apparently it left CarGurus wondering the same thing, so they asked.

CarGurus is an online car shopping and research tool, and since its inception in 2006, it has published some exciting surveys and studies. For the self-driving car opinion study, CarGurus researchers contacted 1,873 vehicle owners in the US, ages 18 to 65 with a household income of over $25,000. What it learned is pretty interesting.

First, let's get the significant number out of the way: 79 percent of those surveyed said they were not excited about autonomous cars. Fully 84 percent said they wouldn't own an autonomous vehicle in the next five years, though this is less surprising to us, given where the technology is right now...

...The survey's findings on public perception of companies developing self-driving tech are also fascinating. When asked which companies are most trusted to create autonomous cars, 27 percent of respondents reported that no companies could be trusted. Interestingly, Tesla was nearly three times more likely to be trusted than Toyota and almost five times more than Waymo, one of the current leaders in developing self-driving tech...
.8
Sounds like car companies telling us what we want. I have felt like this has been happening more and more lately......especially since my last purchase.
 

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Sounds like car companies telling us what we want. I have felt like this has been happening more and more lately......especially since my last purchase.

Own a car that you will not drive because it drive itself, is not for me. I prefer to take the public transportation ( metro, train, bus...).
Different issue is a car with many safe electronics devices: automatic braking, automatic parking, intelligent cruice control, line keep assist and many other electronic assist to make the drive safer and more relaxing.

But I want to drive my next car...
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Quote: hoss96racing @ B0N

I am a mechanical engineer and have worked for a supplier that is developing their own autonomous program. I don't see any point with current technology that true self driving cars will work... there will need to be major infrastructure put in place to guide the cars and let them know where they are and where they should be. there are too many variables and computers aren't smart enough yet. It will come someday but there needs to be set rules on how it will work and how the system be built.


maaaaaybe&other-than for very-limited-access Highways,
it's gonna HAVE to be something like a virtual-slotcars track or railroad
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If I didn't want a steering wheel I'd catch the bus. Why the . would anyone not catch the bus but go pay many, many tens of thousands of dollars for a car with no steering wheel? Or is it regarded as a personal chauffeur that can do as you bid until (Bond villian) Musk decides to hijack you?

J... we're not going to take it... J
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Battle for supremacy
General Motors and Waymo have emerged as the leaders in developing and deploying self-driving vehicles. They represent a battle between traditional automakers and technology disrupters
AutomotiveNews
- Michael Wayland - May 28, 2018

The best example of a dinosaurs-vs.-disrupters battle may be the race to deploy self-driving vehicles between General Motors and Google spinoff Waymo.

Both have emerged as leaders. Both are playing to their strengths. Both are spending billions to expand development and testing to fend off traditional competitors such as Ford Motor Co. and many auto suppliers that other automakers are counting on for off-the-shelf autonomous vehicle systems.

“I would definitely put GM and Waymo at the top of the heap in readiness of technology but also figuring out the business side of it,” said Sam Abuelsamid, a senior analyst at Navigant Research.

The companies are taking different routes, and it won’t be clear for some time which, if either, will emerge as king of the hill. It may come down to which has the better virtual reality setup. Or which can turn the technology into a consumer product the quickest.

“The technology is just one piece of the puzzle,” Abuelsamid said. “Ultimately, you have to figure out how you’re going to make a business out of that technology.”

Here’s how their strategies break down:

Waymonauts
Google’s self-driving car project, now known as Waymo, is using its software, computing and data resources to create what it calls “the world’s most experienced driver.” The Mountain View, Calif., company is relying on traditional automakers to assemble vehicles, and focusing its expertise on building the self-driving car platform.

It has been working on self-driving vehicles for a decade and plans to release its first public autonomous ride-hailing fleet this year in Arizona.

Waymo is by far the leader in distance driven, with more than 5 million miles in self-driving mode in 25 metropolitan areas using a handful of vehicle designs retrofitted with its technologies. In simulated driving, Waymo reports it has driven more than 5 billion miles.

Waymo, according to CEO John Krafcik, is at a point where it is learning more from its virtual world — nicknamed Carcraft after the popular “Warcraft” computer game — than during road testing.

“It doesn’t mean we can stop real-world testing,” Krafcik told a small roundtable of reporters in late March. “We keep discovering new, interesting pieces in the real world that informs the virtual world we’re building.”

Waymo, he said, takes the most challenging real-world situations for its autonomous vehicles and safely increases the complexity in simulation. The process — called fuzzing — may include narrowing distances from another vehicle or adding pedestrians or bicyclists to a situation.

The company also is combining its road testing with the virtual world in Waymo’s Castle, a 91-acre proving ground for autonomous vehicle r&d.

Cruise control
GM is keeping its autonomous vehicle operations in-house, following the high-profile acquisitions of self-driving technology developer Cruise Automation and lidar developer Strobe Inc., both of California. It has more than a century of design and manufacturing expertise, while it has quietly become the auto industry’s leader in data collection and optimization — key areas for monetizing autonomous vehicles.

The Detroit automaker, which has produced 180 self-driving prototypes, expects to produce and deploy a fleet of self-driving vehicles based on its Chevrolet Bolt EV in 2019. Prototypes of the vehicles have been built at its suburban Detroit assembly plant — making the factory the only mass-production plant to produce such vehicles.

The proving ground and road testing are GM’s traditional strengths. The company also is using simulations and testing similar to Waymo but it’s believed to be relying more than the tech rival on physical testing in Arizona, California and Michigan.

Cruise CEO Kyle Vogt said the company has the capability to run 150 simulations per minute in its virtual world, using a “number of different simulators” that “exercise various pieces of the autonomous vehicle software stack.”

“Simulation is a powerful tool when coupled with on-road testing to achieve, and then demonstrate, the level of performance required to launch commercial product,” Vogt said.

Unlike Waymo, GM has not released its total miles driven. According to the California Department of Motor Vehicles, which requires companies to file accident and disengagement reports based on autonomous miles driven, Cruise vehicles autonomously drove 141,691 miles in the state from June 2015 to November 2017.

Vogt in November said the automaker planned to achieve 1 million miles per month by early 2018. It’s unclear if that milestone has been reached, as GM has released no updates and declined to comment on the progress.

“GM has made a lot of promises; based on their promises they seem very far ahead,” said Mike Ramsey, an analyst at research firm Gartner Inc. But, he added, it’s hard to know for sure. “GM has definitely convinced people, I think, that they are far down the road but let’s be honest. It’s actually really, really hard to know how advanced these vehicles are.”

GM has about 1,600 people working on autonomous vehicles, including more than 600 at Cruise. The company plans to add 1,100 workers from 2017-22 at Cruise.

Total crashes


Public data
The California DMV provides just a partial view of GM’s and Waymo’s testing progress because it does not include activities outside the state.

Waymo, which has shifted much of its testing to Arizona, reports it drove 352,545 miles in autonomous mode in California in 75 vehicles from Dec. 1, 2016, to Nov. 30, 2017.

Cruise, during the same period, drove 131,676 miles on San Francisco’s city streets in 94 Cruise AV cars, which are based on the Bolt.

The number of disengagements during that period: Waymo 63, Cruise 105. The DMV defines a disengagement as “a deactivation of the autonomous mode when a failure of the autonomous technology is detected or when the safe operation of the vehicle requires that the autonomous vehicle test driver disengage the autonomous mode and take immediate manual control of the vehicle.”

Based on the number of disengagements compared with miles driven, Cruise is about where Waymo was in 2015. But Cruise is testing in San Francisco, a far more complex area than Waymo’s testing area then, primarily around its headquarters.

“Not all miles are created equal,” Abuelsamid said. “Waymo has far and away the most. … GM has less testing on public roads but they are doing a lot more of the traditional kinds of testing that they would do with any new-vehicle program.”

Complex roads
Vogt has said Cruise believes it learns 32 times more in San Francisco than in areas such as Phoenix, where it is testing and Waymo plans to launch an autonomous ride-hailing service this year.

“There’s no silver bullet for actually making this work,” he said. “It’s not like there’s a single deep learning system that’s going to solve it all. The complexity likely attributes to the higher amount of accidents Cruise vehicles have been involved in.”

According to the California DMV, Cruise cars accounted for 22 of 27 accidents involving autonomous vehicles in 2017.

Comparatively, Waymo had three accidents in 2017, down from 13 in 2016 in California.

Based on external information available, Ramsey believes Waymo is ahead of GM overall.

“I think that Google is probably a year ahead of any other company, realistically,” he said. “A lot of it comes down to the fact that they’ve been doing it a lot longer and they have worked out a lot of the problems other companies are just working through.”

But that, as well as what company can be first to profitability operating the fleets at scale, remain open to debate.

“I think that in general an OEM that already knows how to do that for production applications is going to have an advantage,” Abuelsamid said. “That’s going to give them a leg up.”
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global: LAST to Level-4 autono M.O.U.S.E.y?

copied from "Teslas are .... "

Tesla Model S Hits Police SUV With Autopilot Mode Allegedly Engaged
Carscoops
| Sergiu Tudose | MAY 30, 2018
"A Tesla Model S with its Autopilot function reportedly engaged, collided with a parked police vehicle in Laguna Beach earlier this week. The impact resulted in the Tesla driver suffering minor injuries, while the police car was unoccupied..."



Another day, another Tesla that hit a vehicle or have an accident with the autopilot engaged...

Is clear that the "Autopilot" device neither is it automatic nor is it a pilot
Is clear that Tesla´s owners cant understand that they need to drive their cars... because their cars cant do it for themselves.
Is clear that infrastructure is not ready for autonomous drive cars
Is clear that Tesla needs to make something to prevent this type of accident continue happening
Is clear that the times when autonomous driving vehicles run free on the public roads are far

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Discussion Starter #77
meanwhile...

Why you should keep your car keys in a metal coffee can
Detroit Free Press
, Phoebe Wall Howard, May 30, 2018 | Updated


Top cybersecurity experts would never hang car keys on a hook near the back door or leave them sitting on a kitchen counter. The best strategy to prevent theft? Store the key fob in an old-fashioned metal coffee can...

...Copying code from vehicle key fobs is easy. Tech thieves can do it from outside your home or a motel. Then they can steal a vehicle or just gain access without owners realizing they've been violated...

..."Vulnerability is everywhere. The fob is a symptom," Shlisel said in a phone interview from his office just south of Tel Aviv. "You're exposed to many attack vectors. Remember your computer 20 years ago? There weren't firewalls. What happens if someone takes control of your car while you're on the highway with two kids inside and you can't do anything? You're doomed. And that can be done today."...

...In 2017, Chinese security researchers had hacked a Tesla Model X for the second time, “turning on the brakes remotely and getting the doors and trunk to open and close while blinking the lights in time to music streamed from the car's radio,” according to USA TODAY...

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