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I saw this the other day on the facebook page, I was hoping there would be some sneak peeks of some stuff but nothing hidden. On a side note did anyone else noticed the surge of Lincoln fans on Facebook? they were at 30k a few weeks ago and now they are over 66k!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
On a side note did anyone else noticed the surge of Lincoln fans on Facebook? they were at 30k a few weeks ago and now they are over 66k!
I was really surprised. Think about the amount of likes when the MKZ Concept is revealed!
 

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Mercury C557
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more Re: Max Wolff

I'd like to label this article "QUESTIONABLE"
so not giving it its own thread...


Reinventing Lincoln - Businessweek
January 10, 2012, 12:01 AM EST
By Keith Naughton

from page 2:
...Lincoln insiders say the remake of the MKZ reflects how much the company is leaning on Wolff’s talents. The new-look MKZ had been set to make its debut at the New York International Auto Show last April, but after seeing the prototype, Wolff immediately went to his new bosses and told them their supposed game-changing car would be a game-over car unless it underwent radical surgery. Getting approval to delay the rollout required sign-offs from Mark Fields, the top North American lieutenant to Ford Chief Executive Officer Alan Mulally, and from Derrick Kuzak, Ford’s global product development chief.

“What he was asking for wasn’t easy to deliver,” says Kuzak, who gave Wolff the green light for an emergency overhaul. The New York intro was scotched and the car’s mid-2012 on-sale date was pushed back a few months to allow time to reengineer parts of its mechanical skeleton.

Wolff started by asking (designer, Solomon) Song what he would have done differently if he hadn’t been shackled with under-the-skin engineering that required such a square-jawed face on the car. Song walked Wolff over to his drawing board, where he pulled out earlier designs that were sleeker and made the car look faster.

“Maybe we could try to get back to that,” Wolff said.

The two designers immediately sat down at a drawing board and begin a marathon sketching session, pushing their scratched-out solutions across the table to each other. When they hit on looks they liked, they took them over to another designer who converted their drawings into 3D computer-animated images they could take for a virtual test drive.

The most complicated feature of Wolff’s design was the front grille of the new MKZ. The car’s avian headlights necessitated an engineering tear-up. To accommodate the headlights’ dramatic wingspan, Lincoln’s engineers had to change the spot where the headlights plug into the frame. That may sound simple, but it requires moving what engineers call “hard points” in the car’s mechanical architecture. And it set off a cascade of changes that the engineers began calling “the Max Change option.” All the underbody parts that connect the headlights to the frame had to be redesigned. The robots and factory tools used to install the headlights had to reprogrammed or replaced to enable a new way of building the car. The massive presses that stamp out body parts had to be equipped with new dies to make those soaring fenders that the headlights now flow into...
 

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FIN Moderator
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Discussion Starter #8
Re: more Re: Max Wolff

I'd like to label this article "QUESTIONABLE"
so not giving it its own thread...


Reinventing Lincoln - Businessweek
January 10, 2012, 12:01 AM EST
By Keith Naughton

from page 2:
...Lincoln insiders say the remake of the MKZ reflects how much the company is leaning on Wolff’s talents. The new-look MKZ had been set to make its debut at the New York International Auto Show last April, but after seeing the prototype, Wolff immediately went to his new bosses and told them their supposed game-changing car would be a game-over car unless it underwent radical surgery. Getting approval to delay the rollout required sign-offs from Mark Fields, the top North American lieutenant to Ford Chief Executive Officer Alan Mulally, and from Derrick Kuzak, Ford’s global product development chief.

“What he was asking for wasn’t easy to deliver,” says Kuzak, who gave Wolff the green light for an emergency overhaul. The New York intro was scotched and the car’s mid-2012 on-sale date was pushed back a few months to allow time to reengineer parts of its mechanical skeleton.

Wolff started by asking (designer, Solomon) Song what he would have done differently if he hadn’t been shackled with under-the-skin engineering that required such a square-jawed face on the car. Song walked Wolff over to his drawing board, where he pulled out earlier designs that were sleeker and made the car look faster.

“Maybe we could try to get back to that,” Wolff said.

The two designers immediately sat down at a drawing board and begin a marathon sketching session, pushing their scratched-out solutions across the table to each other. When they hit on looks they liked, they took them over to another designer who converted their drawings into 3D computer-animated images they could take for a virtual test drive.

The most complicated feature of Wolff’s design was the front grille of the new MKZ. The car’s avian headlights necessitated an engineering tear-up. To accommodate the headlights’ dramatic wingspan, Lincoln’s engineers had to change the spot where the headlights plug into the frame. That may sound simple, but it requires moving what engineers call “hard points” in the car’s mechanical architecture. And it set off a cascade of changes that the engineers began calling “the Max Change option.” All the underbody parts that connect the headlights to the frame had to be redesigned. The robots and factory tools used to install the headlights had to reprogrammed or replaced to enable a new way of building the car. The massive presses that stamp out body parts had to be equipped with new dies to make those soaring fenders that the headlights now flow into...
"The real test of Wolff’s vision will come when the Lincolns he designs from the ground up start hitting the streets, though that won’t happen until mid-decade at the earliest."

So 2015 will be the big year for Lincoln.
 

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Re: more Re: Max Wolff

"The real test of Wolff’s vision will come when the Lincolns he designs from the ground up start hitting the streets, though that won’t happen until mid-decade at the earliest."

So 2015 will be the big year for Lincoln.
It should be... remember 2017 will be Lincoln's 100th Birthday!
 

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Mercury C557
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Re: more Re: Max Wolff

another via Lincoln's facebook

That’s A Lincoln?! With MKZ Concept, Ford Bets Big On A Brand Revival - fastCOdesign.com
01/10 two thousand & twelve

The once-mighty Lincoln has struggled for 20 years. But Ford is trying to turn it around, using the power of design.
Today at the Detroit Auto Show, Ford unveiled the MKZ Concept, which is meant to herald a rebirth for its once-mighty, now struggling Lincoln brand. If it looks bold and even a bit foreign for the Lincoln brand, that’s the hope. "We believe that the trend of reimagined retro has gone by the wayside," Max Wolff, Lincoln’s head of design, tells Co.Design. "For Lincoln, the MKZ is about looking forward rather than back."

Far from being a mere concept, Wolff insists that the production MKZ that reaches showrooms later this year will look virtually identical to the concept you see here. "The average consumer shouldn’t be able to tell the difference," claims Wolff...
...calling the new Lincoln language "transformational." It better be...
 

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Re: more Re: Max Wolff

I'm ok as long as it does not have that horrid tiny 3rd vent window on the rear door to mess up the design. The Z is a new beginning...... (I was playing ZZ Top earlier in my LS8 on the way to work today......) All things Z!
 
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