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Mercury C557
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Sources Say: F-150’s 4.8L V8 To Feature Dual Injection, Replace 5.0L Coyote
FordAuthority

by Aaron Birch — Dec 19, 2016


Should the refreshed, 2018 Ford F-150 and 2018 Ford Mustang bow at next month’s Detroit North American International Auto Show as we’re expecting, both cars might have the same new, normally-aspirated 4.8-liter V8 wedged under their hoods.

The engine, which was alluded to during discussions of the new labor contract between Unifor and Ford Canada, will outright replace the 5.0-liter “Coyote” V8 currently found in both the Ford F-150 and Mustang GT, according to an unnamed source. The same source tells us that this new engine will feature dual injection – that is, both direct and port fuel injection – to achieve greater efficiency than the outgoing 5.0L...

...The combination of both dual injection, and variable valve timing like that found on the Coyote, should permit a higher compression ratio than the Coyote’s respectable 11.0:1. With higher compression generally comes more power, meaning that the new 4.8L could well outperform the 5.0, despite its slightly smaller displacement...
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Does higher compression favor horsepower or torque more?
I am guessing this will have better performance, and slightly better MPG than the Coyote with the 10-speed.
 

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It does seem odd to me that they would be coming out with a completely different motor already rather than applying the updates to the Coyote. Wonder if it will maintain the current flathead style firing order or go back to the modular V8 firing order.
 

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It does seem odd to me that they would be coming out with a completely different motor already rather than applying the updates to the Coyote. Wonder if it will maintain the current flathead style firing order or go back to the modular V8 firing order.
Maybe they still will do updates for the 5.0 but only for something like the Super Duty? Wonder if anything will be shared at all with the 4.8 but from the sounds of the article it might be all new.
 

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I worry that Ford is misunderstanding the power the "5.0" badge carries...but I'm very curious about the upcoming engine(s)...!
 

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I worry that Ford is misunderstanding the power the "5.0" badge carries...but I'm very curious about the upcoming engine(s)...!
As iconic as the 5.0 badge is I think the power is in making as much as reasonably possible in this hyper competitive sports car market.
 

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I should clarify a bit, when I mentioned slightly larger displacement, I really meant very slightly. It's advertised displacement will not change. A bit more bore diameter will help with less valve shrouding, and still maintain the coveted five point oh. Now, from that information, anyone with a small aptitude in engine building or knowledge, will understand why they would do that (cough...voodoo components....cough).

Oh, and there will be no FP crank in it.

But my point in mentioning this, was to clarify that the coyote is going nowhere.
 

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I should clarify a bit, when I mentioned slightly larger displacement, I really meant very slightly. It's advertised displacement will not change. A bit more bore diameter will help with less valve shrouding, and still maintain the coveted five point oh. Now, from that information, anyone with a small aptitude in engine building or knowledge, will understand why they would do that (cough...voodoo components....cough).

Oh, and there will be no FP crank in it.

But my point in mentioning this, was to clarify that the coyote is going nowhere.
Thank you for clarifying, I didnt want my beloved 5.0 badge going away :)
 

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I am wondering if this 4.8 will fit in a D6 Lincoln or Navigator? hmmm
 

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I still don't get the point of dropping two tenths of a liter in displacement which is about 12 cubic inches. The engine won't be measurably smaller than the 5.0 if at all. Anything this engine can do the 5.0 should be able to do when it comes to truck engines. The fact that Wings confirms this is in addition to the 5.0 and not a replacement leaves me baffled as to why. Is it an all new design or simply a smaller Coyote like the Nano engines. If it is all new why not replace Coyote, if it's not all new how does dropping 12CI benefit anything.

I'm probably completely wrong here but I keep coming back to Nano, two closely related engines leaving one exclusive to Lincoln.
 

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I still don't get the point of dropping two tenths of a liter in displacement which is about 12 cubic inches. The engine won't be measurably smaller than the 5.0 if at all. Anything this engine can do the 5.0 should be able to do when it comes to truck engines. The fact that Wings confirms this is in addition to the 5.0 and not a replacement leaves me baffled as to why. Is it an all new design or simply a smaller Coyote like the Nano engines. If it is all new why not replace Coyote, if it's not all new how does dropping 12CI benefit anything.

I'm probably completely wrong here but I keep coming back to Nano, two closely related engines leaving one exclusive to Lincoln.
I wonder the same thing, unless they are boosting it or making a bigger version to be sold with it. 5.0 is small enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
just-imho, there could be a bunch of reasons:
- designed to work with both electrification and EB
- ditto the 10-speed
- can't stop expecting a smaller-yet size variant, like 3.7/3.5, 3.0/2.7
- maybe with one (primarily) for Lincoln: Navi, cD6-Conti, the sport-compact that must not be named
but
chiefly
- I think they found a way to produce a v8 at lower cost


&
'nother article
The Ford Mustang's 5.0-Liter V8 Won't Become a 4.8-Liter in 2018
[UPDATE]

R & T

By Chris Perkins - Dec 21, 2016


There are big changes in store for the 2018 Mustang—which could gain Magneride and a 10-speed automatic, and lose the base-model V6 engine. Now, it sounds like the Mustang GT's famous 5.0-liter V8 could be replaced with a new, slightly smaller 4.8-liter to aide efficiency.

Update 4:40 p.m. ET: An R&T source inside Ford has cast heavy doubt on this ever happening.
The rest of this post has been left unchanged.
Reuters first reported last month that...
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