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so
no benefits of scale/volume ± costs of re-styling;
yet doesn't look ALL that diff?
The restyling is mostly cosmetic to tie in the Ranger's design to the F150 without changing the body like giving it steel front bumpers and an aluminum double bubble hood for example. Lighting/reflector changes were also done to comply with US regulations.
It does not have to look drastically different from the RoTW Ranger since It's basically a North American version of the RoTW Ranger.


-cropped image from ford.com
Compared to the RoTW version, the US version has a separate frame-mounted front bumper (chrome in some) and a double power bulge aluminum hood.

-cropped/removed lens distortion, original image from Motor1.
Making a US (North American) version (with unique styling cues) of a global model isn't exactly new.
 

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
^ it doesn't cost anymore to bend the sheetmetal differently from tRotW since the parts are made here not there
but
there is a cost to designing/engineering WHICH supposedly was required for regulations
so
they could've made the appearance MORE DIFF for the same cost
that's all



other-stuff
just saw someone say RangerRaptor gets revealed/info-revealed next month (or NYC?), TRUE?
( expecting more power )
&
just-saw-someone-say they expect a cheaper base drivetrain eventually** &
WONDER WHAT IT'd BE??

:nerd: ...** like maybe Ford finally learned the early-adopters DO favor higher trims
 

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^ it doesn't cost anymore to bend the sheetmetal differently from tRotW since the parts are made here not there
but
there is a cost to designing/engineering WHICH supposedly was required for regulations
so
they could've made the appearance MORE DIFF for the same cost
that's all
Why should it look more different in the first place? I think it looks good.
Forget about forcing a boxy F150 face on it, the Ranger has a rounded body. :laugh2:

PS: It never bothered you that the US-market Fiesta had longer bumpers (longer more rounded nose/different front fascia) but the styling was nearly identical to its shorter bumper RoTW siblings.

 

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #27
How Ford Modified the Focus RS's Engine for Ranger Duty
We poke around the Ranger's engine and discover a lot of similarities to Ford's hottest hatch

Road&Track
- BOZI TATAREVIC - JAN 22, 2018
many huge pix, over 5000 pixels, @ site

Ford revealed the 2019 Ranger last week, telling us that its sole engine would be a 2.3L EcoBoost with a forged crankshaft and forged connecting rods. They declined to share any other specifications or performance data but luckily they brought an engine to their stand at the Detroit Auto Show. That allowed us to get a better look at how it was developed.

The 2.3L EcoBoost can be found in various configurations across the Ford line. It powers SUVs like the Lincoln MKC and Ford Explorer along with performance cars like the Mustang and Focus RS. It would be easy enough to think that the Ranger motor was just transferred over from the Mustang since they are both in a longitudinal configuration, but it needs enough torque to beat out the Colorado. That's why Ford went with a modified version of the Focus RS motor.

Our first hint that it's based on the unit found in the Focus RS comes from the design of the block. That shows us that the Ranger motor employs a cross-drilled deck for cooling which is only found in the Focus RS at this time. We covered this type of cooling mechanism in our Focus RS head gasket story, but the general idea is that coolant flows through the block below the bore bridge instead of across the top. Inside the block, the rotating assembly appears to be lifted straight from the Focus RS; it contains the forged crankshaft, forged connecting rods, and coated pistons found in the hot hatch.

Although the top is almost identical to the Focus RS block, the bottom has been modified and has a slightly different casting. The oil pump has been moved from its location beside the crank gear and now runs off the balance shafts in the oil pan. This move was likely done to make the front a little narrower in order to make space for the four-wheel drive components that will be used in the Ranger.

The oil cooling system has also been upgraded with the addition of a new housing that includes a larger oil cooler and a filter that now points to the side instead of down towards the oil pan. This housing is novel since it also appears to be where the motor mount will connect to the engine.

The oil pump move is not the only change to the front of the block as the harmonic balancer has also been changed. It now includes a provision for a wider front belt which will coincide with the belt-driven fan that will be installed on the Ranger. This is also apparent when you look a little higher up towards the cam gears where there is now a cast mount for the fan to attach to. The timing cover has been modified to allow for the fan mount and the removal of the oil pump below. The rest of the belt drive appears to be identical to the Focus with the water pump visible in the same 3 o’clock position on both engines.

Moving up towards the cylinder head it is apparent that most of it was transferred over. The head casting and valvetrain components appear to be identical but a few external changes have been made. The valve cover shows some additional strengthening ribs on the front but is mostly the same. The direct injection pump is mounted in the same position on the left rear side of the head but the vacuum pump beside it on the Focus is gone. This pump is used to provide a vacuum backup for the brake booster on the other models and the unit may now be gone or relocated on the Ranger.

We now find an EGR cooler below the injection pump which has not been used on this size of EcoBoost motor in the past. The EGR system was likely implemented to assist with emissions by pumping hot air into the intake to richen up the fuel mixture as needed. The secondary benefit of EGR is that the warm air being pumped back in can also assist to prevent knock when the engine is under high load. The pipe that leads across the back of the head into the intake manifold appears to be the main change to the induction system there as the rest of the manifold appears to match what is found on the Mustang.

Moving around to the other side of the head, we find the familiar three-port integrated exhaust manifold that leads into a twin-scroll turbocharger. Although we do not have exact specs on the turbocharger just yet, the inducer wheel appears to be slightly larger than the Mustang unit.

We find another new piece in this area as this turbo is the first in the series to employ an electronic wastegate. The rest of the lineup uses a mechanical penumatic wastegate so this advancement should allow more granular control of boost pressure. This is important since the Ranger will likely be sold in high volume and small changes like this can help to improve fuel efficiency and emissions.

There are likely other smaller parts that may have slight changes, but the Ranger motor appears to share most of its components with the Focus RS while adding a few new parts. Based on what was shown for the mock-up and the data released by Ford so far, it appears that they might be shooting for a torque monster. I would not be surprised to see it exceeding the torque ratings of its competitors.


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The 2.3L is a proven workhorse motor to continue to build from, and is the perfect choice for Ranger imo, delivering a lot of torque and smoothness in a compact package. I am going to guess 355ftlbs.
I wonder if the US-market Ranger's 2.3 EB will be offered in two power levels like how Ford did it with the 2018 Expedition's 3.5 EB.
 
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