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Safety should be an important consideration for anyone buying a new car, but it’s probably your top priority with a family to haul around.

According to IIHS, there are six midsize cars that are moderately priced and have earned Top Safety Pick+ awards, while nine others have earned Top Safety Pick honors. But just because they’ve all earned accolades from IIHS doesn’t mean they’re all equally safe – some performed better than others in certain crash tests.
Read more about the Top 10 Safest Affordable Midsize Cars of 2015 at AutoGuide.com.
 

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Yet if you go to IIHS, the Fusion is a Top Safety Pick within its segment....... :yikes:

And the ones in the segment that get TSP+ rating all note (with optional front crash prevention)

http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/TSP-List

Almost like a story was written with a hidden agenda!? :thumb:
 

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Yet if you go to IIHS, the Fusion is a Top Safety Pick within its segment....... :yikes:

And the ones in the segment that get TSP+ rating all note (with optional front crash prevention)

http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/TSP-List

Almost like a story was written with a hidden agenda!? :thumb:
The Fusion earned lower marks in the Small Overlap test, no Fords have passed this test yet.
 

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I see a plethora of Ford vehicles with the TSP mark. What are you guys talking about. The TSP plus has nothing to do with crash worthiness, only the fact it has crash mitigation assistance. Which is pretty dumb. Having a couple of sensors flashing, alerting or even scrubbing a bit of speed does NOTHING to add to crash worthiness. Even for the Ford/Lincoln vehicles that offer it.
 

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The Fusion earned lower marks in the Small Overlap test, no Fords have passed this test yet.
I have long had skepticism of the “small overlap” test, I struggle to understand how realistic it is……….

Is it a realistic impact or just a test that most cars rate poorly and thus give the IIHS a reason for existence? Hitting another car (verses a ridged wall where there is zero deflection).

From the tests that I’ve watched, on YouTube it’s almost as if the cars that ricochet off the fastest are the ones that rate better, I’m sure that can be in part controlled by design of the front car, but a lot more to do with luck of the impact, and if one car had its wheels turned or slightly at an angle, or digs in verses bounce off a bit more than another.

If you build to the test, you pass the test, but are you really making a safer car in the real world?

I’d like to see them post normal frontal crash and small overlap for the same cars together, you may find the ones that do well in one do poor in the other, and vise-verse. (which would in a way make this one test in a vacuum almost meaningless)
 

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The small overlap tests seem like they are aiming to improve safety regarding telephone roles, guardrails, trees, etc. instead of other cars. Obviously cars crumple in the rear too, so the collision would be more absorbed than the test seems to test for. Hence my reasoning regarding more rigid structures. As to their effectiveness, I'm not too sure. No matter what, if you are in an accident like that, you're going to be hurt badly, with or without a bent A-Pillar and a little dash and pedal push.
 

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Other car manufacturers can engineer to meet these standards, presumably so can Ford but they have chosen not to for whatever reason. They are not alone in this of course, although it would be nice to see them leading instead of trailing.
 

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Other car manufacturers can engineer to meet these standards, presumably so can Ford but they have chosen not to for whatever reason. They are not alone in this of course, although it would be nice to see them leading instead of trailing.

I’d like to see them post normal frontal crash and small overlap for the same cars together, you may find the ones that do well in one do poor in the other, and vise-verse. (which would in a way make this one test in a vacuum almost meaningless)


Which would you buy?

1) A car that gets 5-Stars in small overlap and 3-Stars in full frontal.
2) A car that gets 4-Stars in both.
3) A car that gets 3-Stars in small overlap and 5-Stars in full frontal.
 

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If safety is your priority, then a 1 star large vehicle is much better than a 5 star small.
Understand and agree, I was simply trying to get Borg to take off his Ford "Bash-Hat" and small-overlap "Tunnel-Vision" goggles.
 
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