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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
welcome to sky-HYPER-ACTIVE ! !


Mazda patents engine with 2 turbos & an electric supercharger
MotorAuthority
- Sean Szymkowski - Aug 21, 2017

We have to hand it to Mazda. Lately, the small Japanese automaker has punched well above its weight with the announcement it would bring a gasoline Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) to market in 2019, dubbed Skyactiv-X.

But, what's this? Another piece of news surrounding a future Mazda engine and it doesn't seem to be related to the HCCI engine. It's a gasoline-powered internal-combustion engine with two turbochargers and an electric supercharger. The patent images clearly show two exhaust-driven turbos plus a single supercharger powered by electricity. The patent goes on to describe the forced induction's role as well. The electric supercharger would supply low-end power while the traditional turbos spool up. What's unclear is how Mazda plans to power the electric supercharger.

Something else that's intriguing about this patent: it's shown fitted in a rear-wheel-drive application. The only rear-wheel-drive vehicle Mazda currently builds is the MX-5 Miata, which leaves us wondering what the automaker is cooking up. Digging even deeper shows Mazda has also patented a near-identical engine that's described to run on diesel fuel as well.

Mazda previously said its Skyactiv-X engine would use a supercharger, but turbos weren't mentioned in the initial announcement, which only intrigues us further as to what's going on here. Automakers often patent solutions without the intention of actually bringing whatever the system or product is to market, but we hope to see more of whatever this particular engine is in the future.

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #22
Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

Mazda.com - HIROSHIMA - 2017/08/08
Mazda Motor Corp announced "Sustainable Zoom-Zoom 2030,"

a new long-term vision for technology development that looks ahead to the year 2030. As part of the new technology to achieve this vision, the company disclosed plans to introduce a next-generation engine called SKYACTIV-X in 2019. SKYACTIV-X will be the world's first commercial gasoline engine to use compression ignition...
plus a video in Japanese

Features
• This new proprietary combustion engine combines the advantages of gasoline and diesel engines to achieve outstanding environmental performance, power and acceleration performance.
• Compression ignition and a supercharger fitted to improve fuel economy together deliver unprecedented engine response and increase torque 10-30 percent over the current SKYACTIV-G gasoline engine.*3
• Compression ignition makes possible a super lean burn*4 that improves engine efficiency up to 20-30 percent over the current SKYACTIV-G, and from 35-45 percent over Mazda's 2008 gasoline engine of the same displacement. SKYACTIV-X even equals or exceeds the latest SKYACTIV-D diesel engine in fuel efficiency.
• With high efficiency across a wide range of rpms and engine loads, the engine allows much more latitude in the selection of gear ratios, providing both superior fuel economy and driving performance.
...
 

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Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

Mazda powertrain engineering has our attention at Ford. I think we are all only a few years away from large advancements in ICE efficiency. Ford has a few secrets up it's sleeve as well. Traveling nearly 50 miles or so on a gallon of gasoline without hybrid technology is no doubt a popular goal.
 

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #24
Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

Rotary could return in both sports car and extended-range EV, says Mazda exec
MotorAuthority
- Viknesh Vijayenthiran - Oct 16, 2017

Mazda is committed to the rotary, though whether the unique engine design is used to directly power a sports car or serve as a range-extender for an electric car remains to be seen.

Mazda has hinted at both options in recent years but so far has tended to flip-flop between the two.

Now, though, a senior Mazda executive has hinted that both options could be on the table.

Speaking with Automotive News (subscription required/avoided), Mitsuo Hitomi, head of powertrains at Mazda, said a rotary will “probably” do duty as a range-extender in an electric car. However, he also said a rotary to power a sports car is also being developed.

Mazda will introduce an electric car in 2019. Akira Kyomen, who is heading development of the vehicle, told Automotive News that the electric car will come with a range-extender option. Based on Hitomi's comments, it’s possible the range-extender Mazda uses will be a rotary.

Mazda has already shown an electric car with a rotary range-extender, the Mazda2 RE Range Extender concept unveiled in 2013. Its rotary was a single-rotor 0.33-liter unit that with a full tank of gasoline could provide 111 miles of range. On batteries alone the concept could travel 124 miles.

As for a rotary-powered sports car, Hitomi said it wasn’t the technology holding back the car but the business case. Interestingly, this is in contrast to his comments made just a month ago that Mazda couldn’t get its latest rotary engine, referred to as SkyActiv-R, to meet emission regulations.

This month’s 2017 Tokyo Motor Show will mark the 50th anniversary of the unveiling of the Cosmo 110S sports car, Mazda's first rotary-powered car. It’s expected that Mazda will preview a rotary-powered car of some sort at this year’s Tokyo Motor Show to mark the anniversary and then introduce the production version in 2020 to mark the company’s 100th anniversary. The Tokyo Motor Show starts October 25, so stay tuned.

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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #25
Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

AlexOnAutos @ FB

Today we get to sample Mazda’s new spark controlled compression ignition engine. This is the first production compression ignition engine (similar to modern Diesel engines) and will find its way under the hood of Mazda cars in the USA very soon. This tech should have a major impact on fuel economy while costing less than competitive Diesel engines. Stay tuned...

& @ FB

Here’s the #SkyactivX! It appears to have a small water to air inter cooler on the front. Nifty. Boost is fairly low, around 5-7 psi so this isn’t trying to be a replacement for Mazda’s 2.5L turbo but a new high efficiency engine for mainstream models...

...vs the naturally aspirated 2.5 it’s comparable in most situations and feels torquier at low RPMs
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Mercury C557
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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

Mazda's product roadmap after Skyactiv-X: diesel, rotary, hybrids, even EVs
What comes after Skyactiv-X for Mazda? A bit of everything

Autoblog
- ALEX KIERSTEIN - Jan 26th 2018

...Mazda will adopt an approach that becomes more and more electrified and diverse the closer you get to 2035. But internal combustion will play a deep and central role up to that point, and probably beyond. Before we get to what those different powertrains, diesel and electrified, will look like down the road, let's stop and think about Mazda's philosophy.

It couldn't be more different from the approach of most manufacturers that are currently producing BEVs and hybrids, which are heavily incentivized by both the automakers and the government, both state and local, depending on the locality. Even with all that cash on top of the hood, the market penetration of electrified vehicles is low. Mazda's too small to lose money paying people to drive EVs and hybrids.

Its risky solution (which is plucky, but has had mixed results) is to simply improve the internal combustion engine. It's achieved the best fleet average fuel economy in the U.S. already, using a range of direct-injection gas engines that are mostly naturally aspirated. A few tiny nods to electrification have been introduced, like i-eLoop regenerative braking and the Demio EV (a Japanese-market, last-generation Mazda2 with a 20kWh battery that was tested with a tiny rotary engine range extender). But the focus is on combustion, not electricity...

...through 2035... ...85 percent will utilize some form of internal combustion engine...

 

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Discussion Starter #27
SkyActive? we don't need no batteri... umm

...Rotary Engine Coming to a Mazda Vehicle Next Year, but...
TTAC
- Steph Willems - March 5, 2018


...Mazda, one of a dwindling handful of automakers not in possession of an electric (or even hybrid) vehicle, plans to change that status next year with the introduction of a small battery-powered car. Coming along for the ride — at least in one variant — is a rotary gas engine designed to go unnoticed by the driver.

Speaking to Dutch outlet ZERauto.nl, Martijn ten Brink, vice president of sales for Mazda Motor Europe, said the electric vehicle and its range-extended sibling will appear in 2019. This jibes with what global powertrain head Mitsuo Hitomi said late last year...

...Sharing a new Small Car Platform with the next-generation Mazda 2, 3, and CX-3, the unnamed EV will debut with dimensions similar to the 3, possible as a “crossover-like model,” ten Brink said.

For drivers worried about running dry while miles from a plug, Mazda will offer the option of a “a range extender in the form of a wankel engine,” the executive added. As there’s only so much battery space beneath a vehicle designed for all types of propulsion, range and battery size should be mid-pack. Having a rotary on board — one designed solely as a generator — not only eliminates fear of being stranded without a power source in the middle of nowhere, it also broadens the model’s appeal.

Not that sales are a huge consideration. Mazda’s treating the upcoming global model as something of an experiment. “Whether we sell 5,000 or 10,000 of them, we are going to learn a lot from them,” Martijn ten Brink said.

Mounted flat, the rotary generator will reportedly be no larger than a shoebox, with related hardware expanding the powerplant’s footprint to that of two shoeboxes. The smooth-running engine, positioned low in the vehicle, should go unnoticed when in operation. (Hardly the spiritual driving experience of past rotaries, but at least it keeps the engine type alive.)

If all this talk of electric vehicles and crossovers has you feeling listless, fear not. There’s still a fire burning at Mazda HQ for a true rotary-powered sports car. Unfortunately, no shortage of uncertainty surrounds this future mystery model, which clearly isn’t at the top of the automaker’s to-do list.

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Discussion Starter #28
via AutoVerdict

Why Mazda Is Fighting For the Future of Internal Combustion
At the 2018 New York International Auto Show, R&T spoke with Mazda engineers about Skyactiv-X and the fate of internal combustion

R & T
- Bob Sorokanich - APR 2, 2018

A chart of the ideal characteristics of gasoline and diesel engines that guided development of Skyactiv-X: Mazda

...A word on how that works. In a traditional gasoline-burning engine, the flame triggered by the spark plug moves out from the center of the compressed air-fuel mixture to the perimeter of the combustion chamber. Relatively speaking, it's a slow process—by the time the flame front consumes the last bits of atomized fuel on the periphery of the combustion chamber, the piston has already traveled a good way downward on its power stroke, meaning the fuel burned at the end of the combustion event contributes less to the overall power production.

Compression ignition is nearly instantaneous—all the fuel in the combustion chamber flashes and burns simultaneously. Uncontrolled, it's a violent process—hence why pinging and knocking in a traditional engine can damage valves and pistons, particularly if it happens at the wrong moment. But Mazda engineers figured out a way to precisely time this compression ignition event using the engine's conventional spark plug. In compression-ignition mode, the engine runs a super-lean air-fuel mixture—up to 30:1, compared to a conventional engine's 14:1. High-compression pistons squeeze the intake mix nearly to the detonation point; when the spark plug fires, the ensuing pressure increase caused by the burning of the fuel nearest the spark plug triggers compression-ignition throughout the combustion chamber. It's like detonation, but precisely timed and controlled, harnessing the instantaneous and complete combustion of detonation to drive the piston down on its power stroke...
 

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Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

Mazda powertrain engineering has our attention at Ford. I think we are all only a few years away from large advancements in ICE efficiency. Ford has a few secrets up it's sleeve as well. Traveling nearly 50 miles or so on a gallon of gasoline without hybrid technology is no doubt a popular goal.
As much as I understood the need for Ford and Mazda to part ways, I still kinda pull for 'em to keep making fun vehicles, and to be a little out-of-the-box. They're similar to how Honda was when they were much more interesting than now.
 

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Re: what the heck is SkyActive? (HCCI update)

As much as I understood the need for Ford and Mazda to part ways, I still kinda pull for 'em to keep making fun vehicles, and to be a little out-of-the-box. They're similar to how Honda was when they were much more interesting than now.
Without Ford "oversight," Mazda is much more free to be the innovative and risk-taking automaker that it is. I too root for them despite the fact that all of their cars (until ...) are FWD-based.
 

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I have heard this myth several times, that once some brands got out from under Ford, they stretched their wings. As if Ford was some tech blocker. Actually, from my perspective, Ford was the one who was freed up once they shed heavy baggage like Mazda and Jag and the like.
 

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Regardless the case regarding Ford/Mazda culture, they did some great stuff together. I think that Mazda does benefit from the "agility" that comes from independence, and shedding the other brands allowed FoMoCo to concentrate on Fords (and, to an extent, Lincoln).

I just wish Mazda didn't seem to build a 6-foot height max into their cars....
 
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Ford simply under-invested in their PAG devisions and tried to force shared platforms and technology despite the reality that Ford had very different priorities than their luxury brands. It was fundamentally impossible to turn around those businesses with a mass-market foundation. They just couldn't make it work and the products that resulted from that relationship were very few and very poor, the X-Type is perhaps the greatest example of how monumentally dysfunctional that relationship was. It also doesn't help that Ford's buying spree was a symptom of a misguided company that would be nearing bankruptcy by the end of it.

And there is no question the PAG brands failed to thrive under Ford but found their wings under the freedom of smarter investors. But it's also easy to forget that Ford bought those PAG brands when they were already struggling.

Although the PAG brands have long since passed Lincoln when it use to be the opposite, Ford has learned allot by how those brands thrived on their own and have applied some of that administrative thinking to finally help Lincoln be more independent. As badly as Ford has messed up their luxury efforts, at least they are persistent and slowly learning from their own mistakes.
 

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Regardless the case regarding Ford/Mazda culture, they did some great stuff together. I think that Mazda does benefit from the "agility" that comes from independence, and shedding the other brands allowed FoMoCo to concentrate on Fords (and, to an extent, Lincoln).
Of course they did some good together, far more good than bad, contrary to some repeated diatribes, which was my only point.

A specific case in point regarding just powertrains, Ford had been tied to the long ago co-developed I4 Mazda engine family. For years we would develop from relatively large bore spacing that was linked to manufacturing/ tooling and worst yet was DAMB valvetrain (direct acting mechanical bucket) which is inferior in every way to RFF, which began proliferating back into Ford engines once again years ago, but only recently showing up. I was heavily involved with development of the 2.5/3.0L V6 engine in early 90's (one of my first tasks at Ford) which used a great RFF valvetrain in a compact design. Ford has been switching back for all engines to RFF, beginning with nano development.
 

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Weren't the Duatec V6 engine designs purchased from Porsche and developed with Cosworth for the 1993 Mondeo. How much of this engine was actualy Dearborn designed?

Duratec were great performers but notorious for their short lives.
 

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Weren't the Duatec V6 engine designs purchased from Porsche and developed with Cosworth for the 1993 Mondeo. How much of this engine was actualy Dearborn designed?

Duratec were great performers but notorious for their short lives.
History is correct but not the short life part, the Duratecs in the 90s Tauruses were pretty **** reliable I remember reading about members who had 200 even 300k miles on their Duratec Taurus and Sables.
 

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History is correct but not the short life part, the Duratecs in the 90s Tauruses were pretty **** reliable I remember reading about members who had 200 even 300k miles on their Duratec Taurus and Sables.
I remember that being the case for the iron block engines with less valves, definitely not the Duratecs.
 

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Plenty of Porsche engineering is what you hear, which basically meant we purchased their design of a similar 60 deg engine and adapted it into the then new 2.5/3.0L family. It's not like a bunch of Germans were sharing our cafeteria in Dearborn overseeing us Americans who worked for years on the all new designs. Seemed like an intriguing idea at the time, but later proved to be equally problematic. We also sub contracted Cosworth for their innovative casting process for block and heads. Much was learned by Ford, regardless.


Both engines shared most parts, differentiated only by bore size. You only hear about durability issues with 3.0L, because Ford put far more of them on the road with Taurus/Sable and Escape/Mariner than they did Contour/Mystique 2.5L. Piston slap and bore wear wear early problems and later corrected, but even today you see many old Taurus 3.0L with well over 200K miles. I had a Contour and several Tauruses and they were among my most dependable cars ever.
 

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I remember that being the case for the iron block engines with less valves, definitely not the Duratecs.
There was constant bickering on the TCCA over which engine was better the 3.0 Vulcan or the 3.0 Duratec in terms of reliability. In terms of simplicity the Vulcan won since it was a push rod design. But both were very reliable, as I said there were plenty of members who were able to make it that high on both motors. My Sable had 140k all original minus the spark plugs and wires on my Duratec it was also one of the main reasons I went with the 3.0 vs the 3.9 on the LS when I upgraded the 3.0 was far more reliable than the 3.9 Jaguar based engine. The weak point on the Tauruses and Sables during those years was the transmission but not the engines.
 
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Actually, at least in Michigan, the biggest issue with those cars were rust, I know my '96 completely rotted out in a couple of years after it hit 100,000 miles. It's one of those vehicles in which the mechanicals way outlived the body. I'm not sure why Ford had such a hard time nailing rust in the 80's and 90s, they seemed to fix it by the 2000s. One of the longest lived Fords I've seen recently is the original Escape and Focus (despite their initial problems). Those I4s run forever and the bodies were relatively slow to rust out, especially the Escape.
 
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