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Actually, at least in Michigan, the biggest issue with those cars were rust, I know my '96 completely rotted out in a couple of years after it hit 100,000 miles. It's one of those vehicles in which the mechanicals way outlived the body. I'm not sure why Ford had such a hard time nailing rust in the 80's and 90s, they seemed to fix it by the 2000s. One of the longest lived Fords I've seen recently is the original Escape and Focus (despite their initial problems). Those I4s run forever and the bodies were relatively slow to rust out, especially the Escape.
Never had a rust issue with my Sable but I was washing it all the time and as soon as the temp was above 32 in RI I would be out there getting the salt and such off the car. It really was still clean and almost new looking when I traded it in but not everyone takes care of their cars like that which is something so simple to do to prevent rust. I am still amazed at how many old cars I see all the time in FL that look great with no rust at all of course the paint in some cases is another story from the brutal sun.
 

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Plenty of Porsche engineering is what you hear, which basically meant we purchased their design of a similar 60 deg engine and adapted it into the then new 2.5/3.0L family. It's not like a bunch of Germans were sharing our cafeteria in Dearborn overseeing us Americans who worked for years on the all new designs. Seemed like an intriguing idea at the time, but later proved to be equally problematic. We also sub contracted Cosworth for their innovative casting process for block and heads. Much was learned by Ford, regardless.


Both engines shared most parts, differentiated only by bore size. You only hear about durability issues with 3.0L, because Ford put far more of them on the road with Taurus/Sable and Escape/Mariner than they did Contour/Mystique 2.5L. Piston slap and bore wear wear early problems and later corrected, but even today you see many old Taurus 3.0L with well over 200K miles. I had a Contour and several Tauruses and they were among my most dependable cars ever.
I recently had a cheap (and worn out) 99 Mercury Cougar with the 2.5 and the 5-speed. Despite the previous owners' lack of upkeep, that motor was truly sweet when into its powerband...very tractable, and well-matched to the car's overall personality. I actually might seek another as my "cheap commuter" soon, albeit one that's been treated better. Having owned a Contour previous to the Cougar, I actually liked that platform and only the tight rear seat and some fragile interior trim issues dampened my liking for the cars...oh, and the automatic that died in the old Contour. I'd actually trust those cars (with manual transmissions) pretty well.
 

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Never had a rust issue with my Sable but I was washing it all the time and as soon as the temp was above 32 in RI I would be out there getting the salt and such off the car. It really was still clean and almost new looking when I traded it in but not everyone takes care of their cars like that which is something so simple to do to prevent rust. I am still amazed at how many old cars I see all the time in FL that look great with no rust at all of course the paint in some cases is another story from the brutal sun.
The Sables and Tauruses were notorious for rusting in the wheel arches and inside the front fender. It was not uncommon for a Sable or Taurus in Michigan to rust through it's front floors. It had something do with condensation build up and trapped water. Most of them are extinct up here now. Michigan is a great place to test longterm durability.

https://youtu.be/LGoe3zw_Y9Q
 

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Discussion Starter #44
via GMi

The Clever Way Mazda Nearly Eliminates Turbo Lag
Mazda has an elegant solution to spool up the turbo in its 2.5-liter four-cylinder

Road and Track
- CHRIS PERKINS - MAY 7, 2018


As turbochargers become more commonplace, automakers are developing innovative ways of reducing turbo lag. For its 2.5-liter Skyactiv engine in the CX-9 and 6 sedan, Mazda has a couple of simple solutions to get its single turbo spooled up more quickly. Engineering Explained's Jason Fenske breaks it down in his latest video.

Mazda uses a valve in the exhaust that closes below 1620 rpm to create a narrower air passage leading to the turbo. This increases the pressure of the air rushing to the turbo, which helps spool the turbine more quickly. That means you'll have to spend less time waiting for the turbocharger to kick in at low RPMs. The exhaust valve is aided by a four-to-three-to-one exhaust manifold designed to accelerate air out of the cylinders.

A lot of automakers are working on complicated tech to mitigate lag, including electric supercharging. Mazda's solution is much more simple...
 
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